comparative sociology


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comparative sociology

any form of sociology that involves cross-societal or cross-cultural analysis. See also COMPARATIVE METHOD.
References in periodicals archive ?
in comparative sociology from Florida International University.
At present, the research method of comparative literature has expanded into other areas, and establish many disciplines such as comparative sociology, comparative jurisprudence, and so on.
This study in comparative sociology, driven by "anthropological theory" and fashionable tropes of "discourse analysis," makes vast and sweeping historical claims about complexities of Indian and Chinese cultures.
The book's sections cover: the classical sociology of the law as articulated by such figures as Niklas Luhmann and Jurgen Habremas; critical approaches, including coverage of Marxism, Piere Bourdieu, feminist legal theory, and critical race theory; actor-centered theories such as new legal realism and Bruno Latour's legal anthropology; postmodernism and postcolonialism; and global issues such as legal pluralism, law beyond the state, law and regulation in late modernity, and comparative sociology of the law.
Consistent with the author's intention of suggesting how comparative sociology "should" or "might usefully" be "reconstructed," almost every page is replete with a rich array of historical, ethnographic and comparative sociological examples drawn from a lifetime of learning.
Clark, Edinburgh, 1986); Stephen Sharot, A Comparative Sociology of World Religions: virtuosos, priests, and popular religion (NY: New York University Pres, 2001).
The contributions of this book are many, including its theoretical and methodological contribution of the fields of race and ethnic relations, historical and comparative sociology and political sociology.
The paper by Natarajan examines a topic that is probably the most studied subject in comparative sociology, that of modernization.
Sammy Smooha, "The Status of Minority in an Ethnic Democracy: The Arab Minority in Israel", Reading in the Revival of Israel, 6 (1996), 277-311 (in Hebrew, luonim Be Tquomat Ysrael); Sammy Smooha and Theodor Hanf, "The Diverse Modes of Conflict Regulation in Deeply Divided Society", International Journal of Comparative Sociology, 33 (1992), 26-47; and Sammy Smooha, "Ethnic Democracy: Israel as an Archetype", Israeli Studies, 2 (1997), 198-241.
Social historians will generally find this contribution to comparative sociology and demography too demanding of quantitative acumen and too limited in analytic scope.
Ten of the 12 contributions were originally presented in special issues of the journal Comparative Sociology (Vol.

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