compass course

compass course

[′käm·pəs ‚kȯrs]
(navigation)
Course relative to compass north.

compass course

The course that a pilot should fly to maintain a desired track. A compass course is equal to the magnetic course plus or minus deviation.
References in periodicals archive ?
John, from West Kirby, has published East A Half South, named after a magnetic compass course, after retiring three years ago.
Then Brian said it was time to continue the compass course. We grabbed our headlights, set them to red (which preserves night vision better than the standard white light, Everett explained), and walked a few minutes down the trail.
Seals and dolphins played around the boat as it headed south, going slightly outside the rhumb line (the direct compass course or line to the finish in Ensenada) to try and avoid kelp and seek fresh wind.
Since Company B's nearest training facility, Joliet Training Area (JTA), lacked a precision compass course, Company B decided to build one.
Liz wanted to practice her navigation skills and continued following her compass course beyond the reef structure.
Therefore, Ammarell's distinction between 'Navigation' and 'Piloting' (following the author and his technical Western sources, the former dealing with establishing a ships course via compass or stars only, the latter relying 'on "frequent and continuous reference to landmarks, aids to navigation, and depth soundings"' [p.154]) to me seems too much an 'ethic' approach, as his example of steering a boat following a compass course only shows [p.120].
Even in our secure and manicured suburbs, lives don't proceed on compass course.
If your goals define a closer compass course to that direction, then you are effectively accomplishing your mission.
Instead of sailing out of Sydney Harbour and setting a compass course of north-east into the Pacific, their dream was to buy a yacht in the Mediterranean and slowly cruise back to Australia.