Compensation

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Related to compensating: compensating balance, compensating curve

compensation

1. the automatic movements made by the body to maintain balance
2. Biology abnormal growth and increase in size in one organ in response to the removal or inactivation of another
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Compensation

 

(1) The reaction of an organism to injury (or other disruption of vital activities), by which unimpaired organs and systems undertake the functions of the destroyed structures through compensatory hyperfunction or a qualitative change in their function. For example, after renal shutdown or the removal of a diseased kidney, the substitutive hyperfunction of a healthy kidney ensures the excretion of water, urea, and other metabolic products from the body. Compensatory cardiac hyperfunction ensures normal entry of blood into the tissues when there are heart defects or hypertension. Prolonged substitutive hyperfunction is accompanied by hypertrophy of the overworking organ and can lead to its exhaustion. Compensation of function is one of the most important mechanisms of homeostasis.

(2) The restoration of an organism’s normal development after its disruption by unfavorable internal or external influences. Thus, the retarded growth of animal larvae as a result of insufficient nutrition may be compensated by intensified feeding and accelerated growth in subsequent stages of development. Compensation is one of the forms of self-regulation of organisms. Sometimes the term is used to designate those processes in the phylogeny of organs that are due to the functional replacement of an organ (or a part of it) by a different organ (or part of it).

A. A. MAKHOTIN and F. Z. MEERSON


Compensation

 

(1) In civil law, one of the methods of settling obligations (by offsetting of claims).

(2) In Soviet labor law, payments to production and clerical workers that are made in the cases envisaged by law.


Compensation

 

in psychology, the restoration of the disrupted equilibrium of mental and psychophysiological processes by means of creating an opposite reaction or impulse. In this most general sense, the concept of compensation is widely applied to various mental processes and functions. It has received particular attention in a number of schools of psychoanalysis.

In the individual psychology of A. Adler (Austria), compensation is considered to be the fundamendal factor in the formation of character and of a particular pattern of behavior (”life-style”). Adler considered compensation to be the overcoming of inherent traits of inferiority by developing opposite character and behavioral traits. For example, lack of self-confidence may be compensated by the development of overconfidence.

The Swiss psychologist C. G. Jung, regarding the psyche as an autonomic system, calls compensation a principle of psychic self-regulation and of mutual equilibration of conscious and unconscious tendencies. Thus, according to Jung, unilateral conscious tendencies lead to an intensification of opposite unconscious strivings, which are expressed, for example, in dreams that sharply contrast with conscious perceptions.

D. N. LIALIKOV

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

compensation

[‚käm·pən′sā·shən]
(control systems)
Introduction of additional equipment into a control system in order to reshape its root locus so as to improve system performance. Also known as stabilization.
(electronics)
The modification of the amplitude-frequency response of an amplifier to broaden the bandwidth or to make the response more nearly uniform over the existing bandwidth. Also known as frequency compensation.
(psychology)
Counterbalancing a weakness or failure in one area by stressing or substituting a strength or success in another area.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

compensation

1. Payment for services rendered or products or materials furnished or delivered.
2. Payment in satisfaction of claims for damages suffered.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
This is actually a compensating behavior, because you've invested a lot of money both in the robotic arm and in the physical space for a pallet-sized holding area.
Specifically, if technology is not feasible to fix one set of vulnerabilities, it is up to the organization to then execute compensating controls.
Compensating adjustments are deemed to accrue at the end of the transaction year.
A material parameter of primary interest for a compensating capacitor is the temperature coefficient of the capacitor's dielectric material.
The object of empirical work on compensating differentials is to obtain better estimates of c from data sets containing information on wages and worker and job characteristics.
Competent Authority to work toward reaching understandings with our major treaty partners regarding the threshold for creating a permanent establishment (particularly in the service industry) and the acceptability of taxpayer-initiated "compensating adjustments" pursuant to the temporary regulations under section 482 of the Internal Revenue Code.
DISCRIMINATIONMr Awadh expressed disappointment with the continued discrimination and side-lining of the Lamu boat operators despite the fact that their activities will also be adversely affected by the Lamu port activities.He threatened to organise a major demonstration to push the government to consider compensating the boat operators, most of whom will be forced to abandon their trade once the port begins its activities in the area.
Since the 1989 AMA survey, when 90 percent of chiefs of staff worked on a voluntary basis, the number of hospitals compensating chiefs of staff has increased to 45 percent in Michigan.
Instead of changing the mirror itself, the panel recommends compensating for its flaw through modifications to several "second-generation" scientific instruments already under development and scheduled for delivery to the telescope beginning in 1993.
In some instances, a weakness or deficiency in one element may be overcome by compensating factors in the other elements.