competence


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Related to competence: capability, competence and performance

competence

1. Law the state of being legally competent or qualified
2. Embryol the ability of embryonic tissues to react to external conditions in a way that influences subsequent development

competence

(especially ETHNOMETHODOLOGY, and by analogy with linguistic competence -see COMPETENCE AND PERFORMANCE) the fundamental capacities (TACIT KNOWLEDGE, etc.) displayed by social actors as 'S killed’ participants (‘members’) in social contexts. See also SACKS.

Competence

 

(1) In immunology, the capacity of the human body or that of any warm-blooded animal for specific immune response (mainly antibody formation), which may be achieved by the collaboration of cells of several categories—principally the immunocompetent (antigen-sensitive and antigen-reactive) lymphoid cells. These cells “recognize” antigen, since even before encountering it they bear a special receptor or synthesize small amounts of immunoglobulins.

In rats and mice, before immunization, approximately one in 5,000 lymphoid cells of the spleen and blood binds a particular antigen—that is, the cell is immunocompetent for that antigen. After stimulation by antigen, immunocompetent cells are transformed into either the precursors of plasma cells, which secrete various immunoglobulins, or sensitized lymphocytes, which are the bearers of structural antibodies. Clones of immunocompetent cells, or X cells, apparently originate from the polypotential stem cells, or S cells (the precursors of all hemopoietic and lymphoid cells), probably under the influence of the hormone of the thymus. In the X cells, the genes that control synthesis of the heavy and light chains of immunoglobulins are probably successively activated and repressed upon encountering antigen. The descendants of X cells are capable of synthesizing antibodies according to an already selected program.

REFERENCE

Fridenshtein, A. Ia., and I. L. Chertkov. Kletochnye osnovy immuni-teta. Moscow, 1969.
A. N. MATS
(2) In embryology, the ability of the cells of animal or plant embryos to react to external influence by the formation of appropriate structures or by differentiation. Competence arises during particular stages of the organism’s development and lasts only a limited time. In the absence of the appropriate influences, the unrealized competence is lost and replaced by a new competence that leads to the formation of organs that will develop later.

T. A. DETLAF


Competence

 

the aggregate of powers (rights and obligations) of some body or official person, as established by the law, the bylaws of the particular body, or other statutes. The competence of judicial bodies is ordinarily determined by law. In the USSR the competence of judicial bodies is determined by the Constitution of the USSR, the constitutions of the Union and autonomous republics, the Statute on the Supreme Court of the USSR of 1957, the Statute on Military Tribunals of 1958, USSR and republic legislation on judicial organization, and criminal procedure and civil procedure legislation.

competence

[′käm·pəd·əns]
(embryology)
The ability of a reacting system to respond to the inductive stimulus during early developmental stages.
(geology)
The ability of the wind to transport solid particles either by rolling, suspension, or saltation (intermittent rolling and suspension); usually expressed in terms of the weight of a single particle.
(hydrology)
The ability of a stream, flowing at a given velocity, to move the largest particles.
(mining engineering)
A property of rock strata which possess sufficient strength to span a mine opening without failure.
References in periodicals archive ?
The new Competence Center for Automotive and Synthetic Dyeing comes as a new addition to Archroma's existing network of global hubs of expertise: The Global Competence Center for Special Dyes in Barcelona, Spain and the Global Competence Center for Finishing in Reinach, Switzerland.
Finally, 30.9% of surveyed people value as frequent the improvement of their professional practice thanks to entrepreneurship as competence Some suggestions to teachers, from students'side in order to boost the improvement of the competence, are the promotion and motivation of entrepreneurship and to carry out interships outside university to explore new horizons that allow them to obtain innovation and creativity when time to start a business comes.
Once an NZNO member--the vast majority are nurses but there is the occasional midwife or phlebotomist receives a competence notification, Cook helps them navigate the difficult journey.
Long: I really like Campinha-Bacote's definition of cultural competence. She gives a five-pronged approach to define cultural competence.
Keywords: (Self) Assessment, Competence, Higher Education, Earnings, Occupation, Gender, Labour Market
Throughout education, interest is high in exploring and understanding the ramifications of teacher competence (Roelofs & Sanders, 2007).
Her intention in "Asia-literacy and Global Competence" is to raise that awareness and connects the West to the East by researching and analyzing facts as well as describing experiences of cross-cultural nature.
Keywords: Competence, teachers' competence, subject matter knowledge
A person with emotional competence, according to Porter-O'Grady and Malloch (2015), possesses "a high level of emotional intelligence, a strong character, uncompromising integrity, a strong moral conscience, and an optimistic outlook on life" (p.
For example, in Estonia, France, and Italy, the cross-disciplinary (or other compulsory) EE-related activities in primary education are replaced or even duplicated by elective entrepreneurship courses at the successive education stages, making the competence development random [5, 11].
Moreover, the 1998 PEW Foundation Report recommended that states in the United States require that their "regulated health care practitioners demonstrate their competence in the knowledge, judgment, technical skills and interpersonal skills relevant to their jobs throughout their careers." (4) Currently, however, continued competence of dental hygienists, as well as that of other health care professionals throughout the country, is being addressed indirectly and primarily through mandatory continuing education for licensure renewal.