competence and performance

competence and performance

(LINGUISTICS) the distinction between the ability to use language (competence) and the actual verbalizations made (performance). This distinction is made in PSYCHOLINGUISTICS in particular where ‘competence’ more specifically describes the linguistic knowledge and grammar which is necessary to understand and speak one's own language, and ‘performance’ describes the particular utterances that speakers and listeners actually produce and understand. See also COMMUNICATIVE COMPETENCE, CHOMSKY, TRANSFORMATIONAL GRAMMAR, LANGUAGE ACQUISITION DEVICE.
References in periodicals archive ?
Competence and performance of workers are measured by an index developed by the authors.
The next section discusses the literature review related to issues of competence and performance of workers, and the empirical findings.
In fact, the work competence and performance are important measurements of competitive workers as explained by SCANS (1991 and 1994).
ANOVA analysis and Likert scale 1 to 5 are used to evaluate each aspect of the individual worker's competence and performance to determine his achievement and compare between the service sub-sectors.
Daniel Goleman and Richard Boyatzis in collaboration with the Hay Group illuminated the relationship between emotional competence and performance.
Clearly, purchasing can gain in status and strategic importance when a demonstrable relationship can be shown to exist between investments in developing purchasing competence and performance outcomes.
Put briefly, my claim is that Franks' argument depends on assimilating Chomsky's distinction between competence and performance to Marr's distinction between the level of computational theory and that of representation and algorithm, and that this assimilation is mistaken.
As is well known, Chomsky draws a distinction between competence and performance.
If this is right, it is the distinction between competence and performance itself that creates a mismatch between Level I function and Level 2 algorithm; the details of the linguistic theory are immaterial.
The argument starts from the fact that, given Chomsky's definition of them, competence and performance are guaranteed to diverge for any actual subjects; performance directly reflects competence only in ideal speakers unaffected by the limitations which constrain the performance of real speakers.
I have been arguing that Chomsky's distinction between competence and performance cannot be assimilated to Marr's distinction between the computational and algorithmic levels in the way required by Franks' argument.