competence

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competence

1. Law the state of being legally competent or qualified
2. Embryol the ability of embryonic tissues to react to external conditions in a way that influences subsequent development
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

competence

(especially ETHNOMETHODOLOGY, and by analogy with linguistic competence -see COMPETENCE AND PERFORMANCE) the fundamental capacities (TACIT KNOWLEDGE, etc.) displayed by social actors as 'S killed’ participants (‘members’) in social contexts. See also SACKS.
Collins Dictionary of Sociology, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2000
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Competence

 

(1) In immunology, the capacity of the human body or that of any warm-blooded animal for specific immune response (mainly antibody formation), which may be achieved by the collaboration of cells of several categories—principally the immunocompetent (antigen-sensitive and antigen-reactive) lymphoid cells. These cells “recognize” antigen, since even before encountering it they bear a special receptor or synthesize small amounts of immunoglobulins.

In rats and mice, before immunization, approximately one in 5,000 lymphoid cells of the spleen and blood binds a particular antigen—that is, the cell is immunocompetent for that antigen. After stimulation by antigen, immunocompetent cells are transformed into either the precursors of plasma cells, which secrete various immunoglobulins, or sensitized lymphocytes, which are the bearers of structural antibodies. Clones of immunocompetent cells, or X cells, apparently originate from the polypotential stem cells, or S cells (the precursors of all hemopoietic and lymphoid cells), probably under the influence of the hormone of the thymus. In the X cells, the genes that control synthesis of the heavy and light chains of immunoglobulins are probably successively activated and repressed upon encountering antigen. The descendants of X cells are capable of synthesizing antibodies according to an already selected program.

REFERENCE

Fridenshtein, A. Ia., and I. L. Chertkov. Kletochnye osnovy immuni-teta. Moscow, 1969.
A. N. MATS
(2) In embryology, the ability of the cells of animal or plant embryos to react to external influence by the formation of appropriate structures or by differentiation. Competence arises during particular stages of the organism’s development and lasts only a limited time. In the absence of the appropriate influences, the unrealized competence is lost and replaced by a new competence that leads to the formation of organs that will develop later.

T. A. DETLAF


Competence

 

the aggregate of powers (rights and obligations) of some body or official person, as established by the law, the bylaws of the particular body, or other statutes. The competence of judicial bodies is ordinarily determined by law. In the USSR the competence of judicial bodies is determined by the Constitution of the USSR, the constitutions of the Union and autonomous republics, the Statute on the Supreme Court of the USSR of 1957, the Statute on Military Tribunals of 1958, USSR and republic legislation on judicial organization, and criminal procedure and civil procedure legislation.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

competence

[′käm·pəd·əns]
(embryology)
The ability of a reacting system to respond to the inductive stimulus during early developmental stages.
(geology)
The ability of the wind to transport solid particles either by rolling, suspension, or saltation (intermittent rolling and suspension); usually expressed in terms of the weight of a single particle.
(hydrology)
The ability of a stream, flowing at a given velocity, to move the largest particles.
(mining engineering)
A property of rock strata which possess sufficient strength to span a mine opening without failure.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
By far the most popular competency framework used by the organizations that were interviewed was the e-CF (2014), which is not surprising as this framework is designated as European standard.
This integration of sections and learning experiences supports the program goal of improving quality and safety, and assuring competency and confidence of the new or transitioning RN in ambulatory care (Levine, 2017).
It is used to determine to what extent an applicant possesses an identified competency or competencies.
There is no professional qualification wise significant difference in the use of competency based teaching methodology in GCETs of Punjab.
Competency mapping is a process through which one assesses and determines one's strengths as an individual worker and as part of an organization (Ishtiak Uddin et al, 2012).
One of the strengths of competency models is that they are often related to business purposes and organization's strategies (Rodriguez et al., 2002, p.313).
The case records which preregs are going to present during Visit 2 and Visit 3 should contain all the relevant details relating to that competency. Although this is useful, they should also ensure that they know the case record they are presenting inside-out.
Earning the Microsoft Small and Midmarket Cloud Solutions competency demonstrates partner expertise and commitment to delivering solutions tailored to small and midmarket customer requirements.
The main objective behind this research work is to address the research gap persistent in the logistics industry, as there is no prior work on the impact of QMFs on the positioning competency of LSPs in the context of Pakistan.
Unlike other respondents, high performers also use a wider approach to developing digital competencies, including establishing a cross-functional digital competency centre of excellence and/or appointing a Chief Digital Officer (CDO).
It is even more important that they do their jobs in an ethical manner in line with their core values which is why the Professional Ethics and Values domain was added to the Competency Framework," said Debbie Warner, CAE, CPLP, Vice President, Education and Career Services at IMA.

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