competitive capitalism

competitive capitalism

the early form and ideal type of Western capitalism in which competitive market relations predominate; hence this may also be termed market capitalism or free market capitalism. See also CAPITALISM AND CAPITALIST MODE OF PRODUCTION. Compare MONOPOLY, ADVANCED CAPITALISM.
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Competitive capitalism has become the maker of a capitalist social formation because of its nature; this has been the major problem of capitalism and its main contradiction.
Or rather, perhaps he chose not to spend any time extolling the value of competitive capitalism because he likely viewed it the same way Rauschenbusch and Dewey did, which is to say that it was something like a necessary state in our social evolution but one that is better left behind.
Despite these misgivings, Sardoni's critique of Marx is quite valid in relation to Marx's vision of a competitive capitalism, which resembles Keynes's view that firms will produce and invest at the highest possible rates.
Each, he argues, has "reinforced respective status quo values: progressive idealism, competitive capitalism, consumerism, and fear-based militarism" (25).
In the context of a very competitive capitalism forcing its way into every nook and cranny of society (including care of the elderly, the education of children, the health service), it is not possible to initiate or sustain the practices celebrated in the book without strong state effort at both national and local levels.
In Marxist analyses, the term competitive capitalism is also used.
The second question arises from what Muller describes as Milton Friedman's paradox, hi a 1972 lecture to the far-right Mont Pelerin Society (published in Encounter magazine 12 years later) Friedman argued that the Jews "owe an enormous debt to free enterprise and competitive capitalism," but "for at least the past century the Jews have been consistently opposed to capitalism and have done much on an ideological level to undermine it.
Instead, he concludes by using the work of Lefebvre and Marcuse to focus on the injustices permeating the polarised world of competitive capitalism, This modest conclusion sets the book apart from wider academic debates which attempt to define utopia as something overly idealistic and thus unachievable.
Economically, competitive capitalism operating within free markets is the most effective paradigm, both domestically and internationally, according to Howard.
Belief in markets was solidified by industrialisation, even though Adam Smith, the architect of competitive capitalism, foresaw the negative aspects of repetitive work under industrialisation and in his Wealth of Nations highlighted the need for public measures in order to combat increasing worker alienation and foster social cohesion.
The history of world capitalism should be broken into periods: the age of discovery and conquest; the competitive capitalism of the industrial revolution and the creation of the modern nation state; monopoly capitalism and the development of a 'system' of nation states; and now a transnational phase of capitalism that is still emerging.

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