competitive exclusion


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Related to competitive exclusion: Competitive exclusion principle, Resource partitioning

competitive exclusion

[kəm′ped·əd·iv iks′klüzh·ən]
(ecology)
The result of a competition in which one species is forced out of part of the available habitat by a more efficient species.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In this section, we show that system (2) allows the competitive exclusion of two competing predators for some values of parameters, which implies that the competitive exclusion of two predators competing for a single prey species is possible when the predator functional response to the prey density is linear.
In the case when [A.sub.1] > 1, all equilibrium points are hyperbolic and all solutions are attracted to the three equilibrium points on the y-axis and we can describe this situation as competitive exclusion case.
Efficacy of undefined and defined bacterial treatment in competitive exclusion of salmonella from chicks.
Some of the probable modes of action for probiotics include competitive exclusion, i.e.
Other early research on competitive exclusion in cotton was done by ARS plant pathologist Peter Cotty, formerly in the ARS Food and Feed Safety Research Unit in New Orleans and now at the unit's Tucson, Arizona, worksite.
griseus from this area supports but does not confirm the idea of competitive exclusion of S.
Considering that plant species show commonly a high degree of evolutionary stasis (Qian and Ricklefs, 2004) and niche conservatism (Ackerly, 2003; Reich et al., 2003), we suggest three explanations for this pattern of phylogenetic structure: 1) competitive exclusion of close relatives (Cavender-Bares et al., 2004, 2006); 2) attacks by specialist herbivores or pathogens (Becerra, 2007; Gilbert and Webb, 2007); and 3) ecological speciation of populations that evolved in situ (Pennington et al., 2006).
This concept known as Competitive Exclusion (EC) based on the fact that this mature intestinal flora excludes certain enteric pathogens, such as Salmonella, from settling down in digestive tract.
From floor drains, scientists at the University of Georgia obtained competitive exclusion bacteria (CEB), including L.
* reduce proliferation of pathogens in animals (prebiotics, competitive exclusion, bacteriophages, vaccines), and
Our new data support the competitive exclusion model with respect to these species but suggest that the geographic relationships among them are more complex than previously supposed.

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