complementary


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complementary

, complemental
1. forming a mathematical complement
2. Maths Logic (of a pair of sets, etc.) mutually exclusive and exhaustive, each being the complement of the other
3. (of genes) producing an effect in association with other genes
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

complementary

[‚käm·plə′men·trē]
(electronics)
Having pnp and npn or p- and n- channel semiconductor elements on or within the same integrated-circuit substrate or working together in the same functional amplifier state.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
As such, Australia now has three types of complementary medicines available to consumers: listed medicines, assessed listed medicines, and registered complementary medicines.
The complementary food by mixing these items is very much effective for children and prices of these foods are also cheap." Former Director of Institute of Public Health Nutrition (IPHN) Prof Dr Fatima Parveen Chowdhury said only 24 per cent people follow appropriate complementary feeding practices, which depict poor complementary feeding practices of the country.
Johnson's lumping complementary and alternative therapies together concerned many of my colleagues as most of us strongly favor complementary or integrative approaches.
This is sometimes termed and commonly referred to as 'alternative' or 'complementary' medicine or healthcare.
Insurance Reimbursement for Complementary Healthcare Services.
If you have specific questions about complementary medicine practices and don't get a satisfactory answer from your doctor, the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, which is part of the National Institutes of Health (www.nccam.nih.gov/ health), has more information.
However, Government Notice R870, published in the Government Gazette 37032 of 15 November 2013, incorporated new General Regulations to the Medicines Act, which finally called up complementary medicines.
"With so many people using and spending money on complementary health approaches, it is extremely important for us to provide the public with evidence-based information to help inform decisions," says Josephine R Briggs, director of NCCIH.
Complementary therapies can be defined as "non-traditional" interventions used for health promotion and therapeutic treatment i.e.
The $30.2 billion spent on complementary health approaches included $28.3 billion for adults and $1.9 billion for children.
Editor Keith Jones presents readers with the fifth edition of a complete source book of introductory information regarding the entire field of complementary and alternative medicine.

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