complementary medicine


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.
Related to complementary medicine: holistic medicine, Integrative Medicine

complementary medicine

the treatment, alleviation, or prevention of disease by such techniques as osteopathy, homeopathy, aromatherapy, and acupuncture, allied with attention to such factors as diet and emotional stability, which can affect a person's wellbeing
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Australia's complementary medicines industry is estimated to be worth about $4.9 billon annually, and has experienced $2.0 billion growth over the last 5 years.
"We are working on developing a comprehensive strategy for complementary medicine by adopting a research-based methodology and to take part in research specialising in complementary medicine such as ozone therapy," said Dr Kalban.
Most integrative practitioners make a significant distinction between complementary medicine, which is used in addition to standard of care therapies, and alternative medicine, which is used instead of conventional therapies.
A survey of the use of complementary medicine by a self-selected community group of Australian women with polycystic ovary syndrome.
The proposed amendments to the complementary medicine definition provide additional origins, widen the claims and added a subcategory, i.e.
Complementary medicine, also known as "alternative" or "integrative" medicine and comprising health care approaches that lie outside the realm of what would traditionally be called mainstream or "Western" medicine, is used by nearly 40% of Americans, according to the NIH, to treat a wide range of illnesses and alleviate symptoms of chronic pain, among other conditions.
This came today following the launch of the 2nd Gulf Conference for Complementary Medicine under the title "Towards a complementary medicine based on evidence," which was organized by the National Center for Alternative Medicine in Riyadh.
Bodeker, Director of the Global Initiative for Complementary Medicine presented a lecture on the spreading of use of complementary medicine, highlighting its uses in the GCC states.
Geographically, patients in the Western United States were more likely to try complementary medicine alternatives, compared with Midwestern patients (OR, 1.49; 95% CI, 1.29-1.72; P less than .0001), while patients in the Northeastern United States were even less likely than their Midwestern counterparts to try these alternatives (OR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.74-0.93; P less than .0001 for both values).
The council serves as the principal advisory body to NCCAM, the lead federal agency for research on complementary medicine, and a component of the National Institutes of Health.

Full browser ?