complete flower

complete flower

[kəm′plēt ′flau̇·ər]
(botany)
A flower having all four floral parts, that is, having sepals, petals, stamens, and carpels.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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The Hibiscus was named by Linnaeus in 1753 and the plant belongs to family Malvaceae, It is a typical complete flower usually studied by students when taking up botany, similar to the dissection of frogs when studying zoology.
In Flower Mound, Texas, Balfour Beatty recently partnered with HKS Architects to complete Flower Mound Presbyterian Hospital, a project that relied on IPD principles while utilizing separate design and construction management contracts.
A complete flower, such as the one in Figure 5-3, has sepals, petals, stamens, and pistil all present.
Using one of the search engines on the Internet, such as Goggle, Yahoo!, Ask.com, and MSN Live Search, find more information by searching for these words or phrases: incomplete flower, complete flower, pistil, vascular system, root structure, modified roots, meristems, nitrogen fixation, mycorrhiza, apical dominance, botanical names, morphology, dry fruits, fleshy fruit, angiosperms, and gymnosperms.
The complete Flower Mound report is available at: www.americanforests.org/resources/urbanforests/analysis.php.
* Complete flower. The complete flower contains all four major flower parts: sepals, petals, stamens, and pistils.
A botanically complete flower is a flower that has four main parts called sepals, petals, stamens, and pistils.
The Complete Flower Paintings and Drawings of Graham Stuart Thomas (Harry N.
At this stage, the as-synthesized product became complete flowers. The present phenomenon is similar to the report of Zhu et al.
Complete flowers are composed of stamens, pistils, petals, and sepals.

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