core

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Core

(kō`rē), variant of KorahKorah
, in the Bible. 1 Levite leader, with Dathan and Abiram, of the unsuccessful revolt in the desert against the exclusive priesthood of the Aaronic family and against the leadership of Moses; the rebels were consumed by fire and earthquake.
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core

1. The central region of a star, such as the Sun, in which energy is generated by thermonuclear reactions.
2. The central region of a differentiated planet or satellite, such as the Earth or Moon.

Core

 

a cylindrical column of rock drilled out as a result of annular breaking of the face of a borehole. The crushed rock is brought to the surface through the annulus outside or inside the pipe by mud or compressed air or gas injected into the borehole by a mud pump or compressor, and the core enters a core barrel. Every 0.5–6.0 m, the core is wedged, separated from the bottom, and raised to the surface with the coring tool. The core is conveyed to the surface almost continuously in the internal cavity of the pipe string; thus, the depth from which a sample comes may be determined. A macroscopic description of the core is made according to its external appearance. Later, the core is cut lengthwise into two parts, each of which undergoes chemical, geologic, and petrographic analysis and is studied to determine the physiomechanical properties of the rock. The remaining part of the core is preserved as a basic geologic document. The core yield is defined as a percentage of the drilled length in meters. A 100 percent core yield makes possible the completely reliable study of the rocks intersected by a borehole and the determination of the reserves of a mineral.


Core

 

(archaeology), a piece of flint or other rock from which chips or blades were struck off or removed by the application of pressure and used to fashion stone implements. The core always had a striking platform, that is, the flat surface remaining after the initial piece of stone was broken off; it also had depressions or grooves resulting from the chipping off of flakes and prying off of blades and radiating at an angle to the striking platform. Disk-shaped or tortoise-shaped cores are typical of the Paleolithic Mousterian culture. Pyramidal, pencil-shaped, and prismatic cores existed during the Upper Paleolithic, Mesolithic, Neolithic, and Aeneolithic.

core

[kȯr]
(anatomy)
A fingerprint focal point which is the point on a ridge that is located in the approximate center of the finger impression.
(archeology)
A piece of stone from which flakes or blades were removed by prehistoric toolmakers; usually it was the by-product of toolmaking but may also have served as an implement.
(atomic physics)
The electrons in the filled shells of an atom.
(electronics)
(electromagnetism)
(engineering)
The inner material of a wall, column, veneered door, or similar structure.
(geology)
Center of the earth, beginning at a depth of 2900 kilometers. Also known as earth core.
A vertical, cylindrical boring of the earth from which composition and stratification may be determined; in oil or gas well exploration the presence of hydrocarbons or water are items of interest.
(graphic arts)
An unflanged cylindrical reel on which film is wound.
(materials)
The center layers of a sheet of plywood.
(metallurgy)
A specially formed part of a mold used to form internal holes in a casting.
(nuclear physics)
The nucleons in the filled shells of a nucleus.
(nucleonics)
The active portion of a nuclear reactor, containing the fissionable material.
(oceanography)
That area within a layer of ocean water where parameters such as temperature, salinity, or velocity reach extreme values.
(science and technology)
The central part of a body or structure.

core

core, 6
1. The center of a plywood or crossbanded construction; it may consist of lumber (solid or glued) or particleboard; serves as a base for veneer.
2. The internal structure in a hollow-core door.
3. The wood chips cut from a mortise.
4. The metal bar to which a handrail is attached.
5. The internal structure which serves as a base for complex plasterwork.
6. The molded open space in a concrete masonry unit.
7. The filling within a thick hollow stone wall.
8. The filling between a lintel and relieving arches.
9. A cylindrical sample of hardened concrete or rock obtained by means of a core barrel and drill.
10. A part of a multistory building, containing a variety of service and utility functions, as elevators, stairwells, etc.
11. That part of a magnetic circuit (usually steel or iron laminations) about which are wound coils in electromagnetic devices such as transformers, solenoids, relays, etc.; a magnetic core.
12. (Brit.) The conductor of a cable with its insulation, but not including any outer protective covering.
13. That portion of a grille, 2 contained within the frame.
14. Of gypsum board, the hardened material filling the space between a face paper and a back paper; consists primarily of gypsum with additives.
15. (British) Same as blockout.

core

1. the central part of certain fleshy fruits, such as the apple or pear, consisting of the seeds and supporting parts
2. a piece of magnetic material, such as soft iron, placed inside the windings of an electromagnet or transformer to intensify and direct the magnetic field
3. Geology the central part of the earth, beneath the mantle, consisting mainly of iron and nickel, which has an inner solid part surrounded by an outer liquid part
4. a cylindrical sample of rock, soil, etc., obtained by the use of a hollow drill
5. shaped body of material (in metal casting usually of sand) supported inside a mould to form a cavity of predetermined shape in the finished casting
6. Physics the region of a nuclear reactor in which the reaction takes place
7. Computing a ferrite ring formerly used in a computer memory to store one bit of information
8. Archaeol a lump of stone or flint from which flakes or blades have been removed
9. Physics the nucleus together with all complete electron shells of an atom

core

1. <storage> Main memory or RAM. This term dates from the days of ferrite core memory; now archaic most places outside IBM, but also still used in the Unix community and by old-time hackers or those who would sound like them.

Some derived idioms are quite current; "in core", for example, means "in memory" (paged in, as opposed to "on disk", paged out), and both core dump and the "core image" or "core file" produced by one are terms in favour. Some varieties of Commonwealth hackish prefer store.

core

(1) The heart, or central part, of something. The core of a network is its backbone. A core program would be the primary routines that serve the entire application (see kernel).

(2) In digital electronics, it typically refers to a relatively large, general-purpose logic function that is used as a building block in a chip design. Examples are microprocessor, microcontroller and DSP cores. Cores may be developed internally, but are generally purchased from third-party intellectual property (IP) vendors. See soft core and hard core.

(3) A CPU. A microprocessor with two cores (dual cores) is a single chip that contains two processors. See dual core and multicore.

(4) (Core) A family of CPU chips from Intel. Introduced in 2006, the Core line was developed to supersede the Pentium brand. See Intel Core.

(5) A round magnetic doughnut that represents one bit in an earlier core storage system. When core storage was common in the 1960s, a computer's main memory used to be called "core." See core storage.
References in periodicals archive ?
2), in the bimetal version, from cheaper, tough, non alloyed steels coated only on the active zones (edges) with a layer hardened with CW, with specially elaborated tubular rods typed filler materials with composite core (Binchiciu & Iovanas, 1992), (Iovanas, 2011).
Sanitary Napkins and Panty Shields: Sandwich design contoured products with or without panty protectors (wings); elasticized sides or upstanding elastic cuffs for contoured products; composite core structure; SUPERTHIN (no fluff) products, tube or sandwich design; wrap-less tri-folded superthin products; paper wrapping for tri-folded products; paper bag packaging.
The cited art clearly demonstrates that, it was well known that multiple fiber types could be used in a composite core for an electrical conductor," said Todd Harris, President of Mercury.
09 ppm level and for hardwood plywood with a composite core to achieve a level of 0.
OB ) contained in United States Patent Numbers 7,306,162 and 7,211,319 (collectively the "CTC patents in suit") which are directed to composite core electric transmission cables.
Tenders are invited for 15 ea, duct, rodder fiberglass, 1/4" x 300~, rod made of rugged polymer jacket composite core, comes in lighter weight cage that can be used upright and on the side, with hand-operated wheel brake, threaded ends, plus a tapered head on the outward end.
The cited art discloses at least as early as April 1987, a full 15 years prior to CTC's earliest priority date, that it was well known that multiple fiber types, embedded in a resin matrix, could be used in a composite core for an electrical conductor," said Todd Harris, President of Mercury.
For hardwood plywood made with a veneer core or a composite core, 0.
To further enhance durability, Pergo says its Pergo Select floors will feature new Lustergard Plus, a surface technology that provides greater protection against scuffing and dulling, and DuraCore 500, a specially engineered resin and fiber composite core that "provides greater resistance to water and dents.
Under the terms of the agreement, General Cable has the exclusive right to purchase Mercury's HVCRC product line in The United States and Canada and in consideration for exclusive status agrees to make Mercury Cable and Energy their exclusive supplier of composite core material.
Kumar Shanmugam, Assistant Professor of Materials and Mechanical Engineering, helped develop a novel coating made from carbon nanotubes that, when layered around an aluminum-conductor composite core (ACCC) transmission line, reduces the lines operating temperature and significantly improves its overall transmission efficiency.
Any composite core door, whether particleboard or MDF, is sent to the Sipa press for adding veneer skins or low pressure laminates.