compound event

compound event

[′käm‚pau̇nd i′vent]
(statistics)
An event whose probability of occurrence depends upon the probability of occurrence of two or more independent events.
An event that consists of two or more events that are not mutually exclusive.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Rees, of Birmingham Barbarians, dropped just one arrow out of gold from 90 arrows to finish with a score of 808 in winning the gents' compound event ahead of Anthony Stacey (RLSAS) and Tony Carter (Stourbridge) at Wythall Park.
Cojuangco, seeded 28th after the qualification, lost to French bet and second-ranked Sophie Dodemont, 133-125, to settle for fourth place in the women's compound event.
The hosts are certain to win one gold medal after Ashim Kumar Das and Abul Kashem Mamun made it to the finals of the compound event for men's which will be held today (Wednesday).
Rajat Chouhan ( in pic) won the men's individual compound event after a shoot- off with Yong Hee Choi of Korea.
In the men's compound event, Rugby's Chris White finished second with 1,397, with Colin Geenes (Meriden) seventh with 1,369.
The platform integrates, via the cloud, all of the technologies required to leverage big data, including compound event processing(2), parallel distributed processing, data compression and anonymization, and data mashups(3).
There was also gold in the men's team compound event where John Stubbs, Richard Hennahane and Eric Thomas saw off the challenge of Korea in a tense final which saw the British archers win by three points.
There was also gold in the men's team compound event, where John Stubbs, Richard Hennahane and Eric Thomas saw off the challenge of Korea in a tense final, which saw the British archers win by three points.
Britain's Nicky Hunt is favourite in the compound event and will also team up with Chris White in tomorrow's mixed team competition.
Moreover, the incident and the subsequent commentary about the incident (including my own) are inseparably bound, making up a compound event of action, narrative, and primary and secondary interpretation.
If we examine the nature of A', we see that A' denotes an event composed of the mutually exclusive events other than A and we call it a compound event. Thus, the probability of A', P(A') is the sum of the probabilities of all of the elementary events except A.
To causally explain a compound event A&B (like Aristotle's example: the brigands arrive at the well & the man arrives at the well) would be either for one of the component events to be necessary and sufficient for the other, or for a third event to be necessary and sufficient for A and for B (a common cause).