compress


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Related to compress: hot compress

compress

1. a wet or dry cloth or gauze pad with or without medication, applied firmly to some part of the body to relieve discomfort, reduce fever, drain a wound, etc.
2. a machine for packing material, esp cotton, under pressure
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Compress

 

a bandage used for healing purposes.

A dry compress (usually cotton-gauze) is applied to a painful or injured part of the body (wound, burn) to protect it from chilling and other external irritants and to absorb any discharges. Wet compresses may be either cold (lotion) or hot (poultice). A heating compress (a damp material covered with waterproof paper or oilcloth and a layer of cotton) is used with inflammatory processes as a revulsive and resorptive. A medicinal compress is one in which medicinal substances (ointments, pastes, novocain) are added to the water.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

compress

(1)
To feed data through any compression algorithm.

compress

(tool)
The Unix program "compress", now largely supplanted by gzip.

Unix compress was written in C by Joseph M. Orost, James A. Woods et al., and was widely circulated via Usenet. It uses the Lempel-Ziv Welch algorithm and normally produces files with the suffix ".Z".

Compress uses variable length codes. Initially, nine-bit codes are output until they are all used. When this occurs, ten-bit codes are used and so on, until an implementation-dependent maximum is reached.

After every 10 kilobytes of input the compression ratio is checked. If it is decreasing then the entire string table is discarded and information is collected from scratch.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

compress

(1) To compact data to save space. See data compression and archive program.

(2) A Unix utility used to compress files. This is the perfect example of poor technical naming. When a common name is used to name a function, it becomes tedious to document the process. For example, "use gzip to compress the file instead of compress because..." See archive formats, tar, gzip and data compression.
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References in periodicals archive ?
For the average company, such a program can save up to 50% of the cost of compressed air by inexpensive housekeeping measures such as making end-users aware of the cost of compressed air and enlisting their help in reporting leaks.
If somehow a metadata record could not be created or there was a problem with a compressed image, that information was entered in an Excel spreadsheet for a substitute record.
Before the compressed files were excluded, somewhere between 33GB and 35GB of data could be stored onto an Ecrix V17 cartridge.
Using a 2,000-joule laser, they uniformly compressed deuteriumtritium fuel capsules to more than 100 times the fuel's liquid density, which is 10 times better than their previous directdrive laser fusion work.
Better Control: The efficiency of the production of compressed air can be improved using more efficient compressor part load control modes, or in the case of multiple compressors with some sort of central controller.
Compressed air contaminated by oil is pure poison for the quality of food and beverages.
David Simpson, production director at Lees, said: "When it came to choosing our new compressed air partner, what we looked for was a company with a thorough understanding of all the new BCAS compressed air code of practice, someone who understood compressed air efficiency and reliability, had industry experience, competence and know-how, local support and back-up, as well as energy saving solutions, Airchannel ticked all these boxes and more, and we are pleased with the relationship we have."
Most mills design supply with no idea of compressed air demand, believing that the system is supply-driven or can be controlled by supply.
Recognizing that the time he spent fighting rust was making it difficult for him to keep up with his other responsibilities, he sought and obtained authorization from his management to seek out a method of solving the problem at its source by removing water from the compressed air lines.
Production consistency, uptime and low scrap generation are often dependent on the compressed air supply that supports the equipment.
Surprisingly, in many cases, compressed air consumption is a completely unknown factor (70% in one survey), and only 20% of the surveyed companies had already tried to implement a process of optimising their processes and networks.
A One of the biggest fault areas with a compressed air system is leakage.

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