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Related to compressible: Compressible flow, Compressible fluid

compress

1. a wet or dry cloth or gauze pad with or without medication, applied firmly to some part of the body to relieve discomfort, reduce fever, drain a wound, etc.
2. a machine for packing material, esp cotton, under pressure
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Compress

 

a bandage used for healing purposes.

A dry compress (usually cotton-gauze) is applied to a painful or injured part of the body (wound, burn) to protect it from chilling and other external irritants and to absorb any discharges. Wet compresses may be either cold (lotion) or hot (poultice). A heating compress (a damp material covered with waterproof paper or oilcloth and a layer of cotton) is used with inflammatory processes as a revulsive and resorptive. A medicinal compress is one in which medicinal substances (ointments, pastes, novocain) are added to the water.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

compress

(1)
To feed data through any compression algorithm.

compress

(tool)
The Unix program "compress", now largely supplanted by gzip.

Unix compress was written in C by Joseph M. Orost, James A. Woods et al., and was widely circulated via Usenet. It uses the Lempel-Ziv Welch algorithm and normally produces files with the suffix ".Z".

Compress uses variable length codes. Initially, nine-bit codes are output until they are all used. When this occurs, ten-bit codes are used and so on, until an implementation-dependent maximum is reached.

After every 10 kilobytes of input the compression ratio is checked. If it is decreasing then the entire string table is discarded and information is collected from scratch.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

compress

(1) To compact data to save space. See data compression and archive program.

(2) A Unix utility used to compress files. This is the perfect example of poor technical naming. When a common name is used to name a function, it becomes tedious to document the process. For example, "use gzip to compress the file instead of compress because..." See archive formats, tar, gzip and data compression.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Wang, "Global existence and large-time behavior of solutions to the three-dimensional equations of compressible magnetohydrodynamic flows," Archive for Rational Mechanics and Analysis, vol.
This study focuses on the transition between absolute instability (AI) and convective instability (CI) for a compressible inviscid shear layer, which are dominated by modes with zero group velocity.
That is, in the flame zone with negative dilatation (P > 0), a fluid element tends towards stability and the stable topology probability increases gradually, while, in the flame zone with positive dilatation (P < 0), a fluid element tends towards instability and the unstable topology dominates, in accordance with the conclusions of Suman and Girimaji [14] on compressible isotropic turbulence and Wang and Lu [15] on compressible turbulent boundary layers.
Chung, "Aerodynamic characteristics of deflected surfaces in compressible flows," Journal of Aircraft, vol.
The eigenvectors of the matrix [[??].sub.H] do not represent all vibration modes of the plate in compressible fluid.
Key words: boundary element method, hydrodynamics, Lagrange interpolation, compressible fluid
Lavik said: "The military has been phenomenal at developing technology to halt bleeding, but the technology has been effective only on external or compressible injuries....
The direct compressible grades allow first-rate tableting properties.
The shielded door has compressible fingerstock in a knife-edge configuration.
Interstate Thermal Insulation Foam is made from a compressible polyolefin that is chemically crosslinked for added stability; the skin is said to be moisture-proof and resistant to microorganisms.
Optional features are available for automatic pressure setting and exclusion press cylinders, laminating compressible materials and detection of platen deflection in the event of improper loading.