compression refrigeration

compression refrigeration

[kəm′presh·ən ri‚frij·ə′rā·shən]
(mechanical engineering)
The cooling of a gaseous refrigerant by first compressing it to liquid form (with resultant heat buildup), cooling the liquid by heat exchange, then releasing pressure to allow the liquid to vaporize (with resultant absorption of latent heat of vaporization and a refrigerative effect).
References in periodicals archive ?
Developed for commercial applications during the first half of the 20th century, modern vapor compression refrigeration systems power the air conditioning in our homes, office buildings, and cars, as well as satisfy our residential and commercial refrigeration needs.
Simultaneously, in pursuit of high energy efficiency a two-stage compression refrigeration cycle was adopted and optimal engineering of the refrigeration cycle was carried out through optimization of pipe diameters, etc.
At the beginning of the 20th century, engineers had been building and operating vapor compression refrigeration systems for nearly 50 years but had a very sketchy idea of what was actually happening.
The main objective of this work is to write simulation program for a vapour compression refrigeration system in order simulate its steady state behavior.
2010 [9] made a comparative study for five solar cooling systems types included; solar absorption refrigeration, solar mechanical compression refrigeration, solar electric compression refrigeration, and solar solid desiccant cooling.
As a result, a director of the New Zealand and Australian Land Company (NZALC) was dispatched to London to investigate a new technology, Bell-Coleman compression refrigeration units.
This is used to support ancillary systems such as feed pumps, an alternator and fans for air circulation, and to drive the compressor of a vapour compression refrigeration cycle that provides additional cooling.
Absorption cycles can be associated with heat-driven cooling cycles, such as the case of a heat-driven power cycle that drives a mechanical compression refrigeration system (Herold et al.
Aphornratana and Sriveerakul [25] theoretically analyzed a combined Rankine vapor compression refrigeration cycle powered by low grade thermal energy.
The two-stage compression refrigeration system in Figures 3 and 4 operates with a pressure range of 1.9 and 5.0 bar.
Bilgili, "Hourly simulation and performance of solar electric-vapor compression refrigeration system," Solar Energy, vol.