compression wood

compression wood

[kəm′presh·ən ‚wu̇d]
(botany)
Dense wood found at the base of some tree trunks and on the undersides of branches.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

compression wood

Abnormal wood formed on the underside of branches and leaning trunks of softwoods; usually lower in strength; has unusual shrinkage characteristics.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
These results are maybe due to the fact that these types of timbers in the structural size have the high possibility containing internal growth defects as it increased in size in the form of knots, zones with compression wood, and whole lot more.
A leaning conifer with rot or hollow butt will have compression wood on the lower side that is weak; hence the hinge must be thicker.
Air permeability in longitudinal and radial directions of compression wood of Picea abies L.
It has been widely studied in Eucalyptus, Populus trichocarpa, and pines in order to profile transcripts related to tension and compression wood, and to achieve clues about their regulatory network [27, 35-38].
They involved faces of tediously tapered Osage (compression wood) backed by desert hackberry (tension wood), reflexed on a 24-inch radius, further reflexed (but not quite static) after splicing more hack-berry into the tips, the lighter material used to reduce weight and increase speed.
After tilting, conifers normally start to form a specialized wood at the lower side of an inclined trunk, so-called compression wood [25-27].
The reaction wood of gymnosperms is called compression wood and is produced along the lower side of the leaning stems or branches, causing straightening by expanding and pushing the trunk upright again.
T 267 cm-05 Compression wood identification in pulpwood
It is characterized by shorter cells, larger microfibril angles, more compression wood, different specific gravity and higher lignin content (Zobel and van Buijtenen, 1989).
"Precompressed" is also unrelated to "compression wood," which is a defect caused by a tree that leans as it grows.
It decreases rapidly in the juvenile wood portion and remains more or less stable in the mature wood portion, unless compression wood is present.