compression wood

compression wood

[kəm′presh·ən ‚wu̇d]
(botany)
Dense wood found at the base of some tree trunks and on the undersides of branches.

compression wood

Abnormal wood formed on the underside of branches and leaning trunks of softwoods; usually lower in strength; has unusual shrinkage characteristics.
References in periodicals archive ?
These results are maybe due to the fact that these types of timbers in the structural size have the high possibility containing internal growth defects as it increased in size in the form of knots, zones with compression wood, and whole lot more.
With conifers, the reaction is weaker compression wood on the side toward the lean, rarely a serious problem, but be aware of it and leave a larger hinge.
It decreases rapidly in the juvenile wood portion and remains more or less stable in the mature wood portion, unless compression wood is present.
After tilting, conifers normally start to form a specialized wood at the lower side of an inclined trunk, so-called compression wood [25-27].
The reaction wood of gymnosperms is called compression wood and is produced along the lower side of the leaning stems or branches, causing straightening by expanding and pushing the trunk upright again.
T 267 cm-05 Compression wood identification in pulpwood
It is characterized by shorter cells, larger microfibril angles, more compression wood, different specific gravity and higher lignin content (Zobel and van Buijtenen, 1989).
In addition, there are limits on potential decay associated with knots, shake, splits, and compression wood.
Compression wood and spiral grain are also more prevalent in juvenile wood than in mature wood and contribute to excessive longitudinal shrinkage.
The variables analyzed were: the amount of compression wood produced, ovendry specific gravity (SG), modulus of rupture, and modulus of elasticity (MOE).
5 - h Compression wood Accepted 2/5 of the cross section Slope of grain 1:6 (16.