compression-ignition engine


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compression-ignition engine

[kəm¦presh·ən ig¦nish·ən ′en·jən]
(mechanical engineering)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
energy consumption by conversion device in 2010, based on our analysis Conversion devices Energy consumption by device [Quadrillion BTUs] Steam turbine 30.59 Spark-ignition engine 17.41 Combustion turbine 9.30 Compression-ignition engine 6.78 Industrial device category 13.03 (boilers/burners/heaters) Appliance category (commercial 10.90 and residential scale) Feedstock 4.99 Hydroelectric turbine 2.51 Compressors/pumps 1.36 Wind turbine 0.92 Binary turbine 0.15 Photovoltaic panels 0.01 Total 97.94 Another 25% of all energy consumption can be attributed to two other (relatively large) categories: industrial devices (primarily boilers, burners, and heaters), and a number of smaller and more varied appliances in the residential and commercial sectors.
John Deere Product Engineering to develop a stoichiometric compression-ignition engine with low-pressure loop-cooled exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and a diesel particulate filter followed by a three-way catalyst.
No doubt, these vehicles are also getting popularity in compression-ignition engines based vehicle like diesel operated heavy-duty vehicles.
200 bar) for compression-ignition engines. The piston is connected to the crankshaft at a perpendicular angle using a connecting rod.
It's taken the company a long time to buy into the philosophy of compression-ignition engines but it now seems to have grasped that if it's to do well in Europe, it needs a diesel engine and a good one at that.
It's taken the company a long time to buy into the philosophy of compression-ignition engines, but it now seems to have grasped that if it's to do well in Europe, it needs a diesel engine and a good one.