compressional wave


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Related to compressional wave: Shear wave

compressional wave

[kəm′presh·ən·əl ‚wāv]
(physics)
A disturbance traveling in an elastic medium; characterized by changes in volume and by particle motion parallel with the direction of wave movement. Also known as dilatational wave; irrotational wave; pressure wave; P wave.
References in periodicals archive ?
Deng, "The Influences of cracks in compressional wave velocity," Progress in Geophysics, vol.
In contrast to the propagation of the compressional wave, the tight connection of the two surfaces is a premise for the torsional wave to transmit from one media to another.
Domenico, S.: 1984, Rock lithology and porosity determination from shear and compressional wave velocity.
The path of particle vibration in the acoustic field is elliptical because the compressional wave and the shear wave have different propagation velocities and the both have effect on particle velocity.
Alternatively, if dipole sonic logs are not available, we may use a prediction equation for estimating shear wave velocity from compressional wave velocity obtained from sonic log.
The compressional waves were measured by compressional wave transducers during an axial compression test as shown in Figure 4.
For shear wave velocities higher than the compressional wave velocity for the fluid, the spectrum of pressures shows more simple patterns in comparison with the opposite case, where some resonant peaks are observed.
However affected by stratification or damage, the compressional wave velocity of a material can be highly influenced by the inhomogeneity of a target.
The rotational part corresponds to a dilatational or compressional wave and the irrotational part corresponds to a shearing wave.
The density of peridotite is closer to 3.3, not 2.3 g/cc and its compressional wave velocity is 8, not 7 km/s.
However, because it is possible to convert energy from P to S (and vice versa) at a liquid-solid boundary, shear waves remain important in ocean seismology even when man-made sound sources, which are frequently located within the water column, generate only compressional wave energy.