computer crime

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computer crime

(legal)
Breaking the criminal law by use of a computer.

See also computer ethics, software law.
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Dorsi co-authored the article Computer Criminal Intent in the University of San Francisco Law Review, analyzing the effectiveness of technical-barrier based defenses to computer misuse statutes.
The 15-year-old computer criminal has pled guilty to a slew of felony charges.
Almost every computer criminal is knowledgeable with computers; some of them are even professional in computer science.
The computer criminal was traced af ter the girl went missing from her home in Clackmannanshire.
From that, he followed a trail of computer hacks over several years, eventually convincing the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), military, international security, and law enforcement agencies to pursue a computer criminal for the first time in history.
Businesses spend millions on CCTV, security guards, and sophisticated alarms systems for their premises but none of this offers any protection against the computer criminal.
The 22-year-old computer criminal - who was jailed in January for creating the world's third most destructive computer virus - writes updates for his Devil Within website via his brother Adam.
Only after the appearance of the movie Wargames in 1983, in which Matthew Broderick portrays a teenager with a modem who breaks into Defense Department computers and almost starts World War III, did the term come to mean someone who was a computer criminal.
Despite a sophisticated reporting system for violent crimes that involves localities, states, and the FBI, no comparable reporting system is in place for the mischief perpetrated by the computer criminal, Consequently, there is considerable uncertainty about the nature and extent of the problem.
From a business standpoint, hiring a known computer criminal because of his or her criminal past is likely to be a liability.
Company officials do not know why the Secret Service found this game a threat to real-world computers, since it contains little information that could actually help a present-day computer criminal. There is far less technical information in this game than in 2600 Magazine [a computer hacker's journal,- company president Steve Jackson told THE FUTURIST.
In the wake of increase in computer crimes, Congress in 1980 passed a bill making unauthorized acts in, around or with a computer criminal activities subject to prosecution and punishment.