comrade

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comrade

a fellow member of a political party, esp a fellow Communist or socialist
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Labour council leaders from around Wales issued a statement which read: "We would like to extend our congratulations to Mark Drakeford AM, on being elected as the Leader of Welsh Labour and also pay tribute to the comradely and respectful manner in which the campaign has been conducted."
More banter follows Saints and Sailors, with a reminder that a Dashboard show, and rock shows in general, are a place of acceptance, comradely and perhaps the least likely place you'll get beaten up.
But with that increased workload came a great comradely vibe as many of us were multi-roling and, at times, cluelessness as when we were supposed to appear and in which costume.
It comes out as a taller strut in my step, a re-invigorated burst of passion, an overwhelmingly warm, comradely feeling..
He wants "a tolerant comradely Labour Party" and then spends his time doing everything possible to bring the party into disrepute by abusing, attacking and undermining the twice democratically elected leader of the party Jeremy Corbyn.
It was acceptable for local parties to express unhappiness with their MPs as long as it was done "in a way that we'd term comradely".
The purpose of these sessions was to not only equip these brilliant students for the upcoming test but also to instill a sense of purpose, competitiveness and comradely among them.
Cricket is one big family and no matter how hard and tough we play against each other, there is tremendous comradely within the group.
Sarwar said: "Our campaign will be conducted in a comradely spirit, engaging with our movement and demonstrating to the country that we are ready to transform lives across Scotland.
Brick House was their 'shared territory' for two and a half years: 'a period of comradely competitiveness and unselfconscious bohemianism that had yielded a rich artistic haul.'
In a nutshell, the two men - friends, and workmates - were spending a comradely evening sipping an hour away, fingers wrapped around ice-cold cans, when one of them, teasingly, called the other 'a shiner'.