comrade

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comrade

a fellow member of a political party, esp a fellow Communist or socialist
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in classic literature ?
"And the sun is gone," she said, her eyes still fixed upon our island, where we had proved our mastery over matter and attained to the truest comradeship that may fall to man and woman.
The soul grows into lovely habits as easily as into ugly ones, and the moment a life begins to blossom into beautiful words and deeds, that moment a new standard of conduct is established, and your eager neighbors look to you for a continuous manifestation of the good cheer, the sympathy, the ready wit, the comradeship, or the inspiration, you once showed yourself capable of.
We had been friends, quite good friends; but never could I get beyond the same comradeship which I might have established with one of my fellow-reporters upon the Gazette,--perfectly frank, perfectly kindly, and perfectly unsexual.
There is at times a magic in identity of position; it is one of the things that have suggested to us eternal comradeship. She moved her elbows before saying:
Their condition of domiciliary comradeship put her, as the woman, to such disadvantage by its enforced intercourse, that he felt it unfair to her to exercise any pressure of blandishment which he might have honestly employed had she been better able to avoid him.
He reviewed his friends' marriages-- the supposedly happy ones--and saw none that answered, even remotely, to the passionate and tender comradeship which he pictured as his permanent relation with May Welland.
I argue that men practice interaction in two distinctly different ways, friendship or comradeship, depending upon their conception of masculinity and the salience of that conception within the specific situation and social context.
In moving the analysis of men's friendly relationships with other men away from one of sex differences to one of gender relations, I argue that men choose to practice either friendship, marked by mutual significance and emotional expression, or comradeship, in which men may experience intense but not intimate relationships given its tendency toward trivialization and group membership.
PATTERNS OF INTERACTION: FRIENDSHIP AND COMRADESHIP
First, I identify two different forms of interaction, friendship and comradeship.
Strikwerda and May (1992) see two types of friendships, either truly intimate ones or comradeship.
I intend to build upon Strikwerda and May's conception and posit two different forms of voluntary personal relationships, friendship and comradeship. These relationships are interactional events and processes that middlers choose to engage in that follow two distinct patterns.