conation


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Related to conation: conative

conation

mental aspects of doing, as opposed to feeling (affection) and thinking (cognition). The term now has limited currency, but was used by PARSONS.
References in periodicals archive ?
Volitional Conation and volition represent "intentional mental occurrence[s]" (Conation) (Ginet, 2006, p.
Therefore, the conation for nurturing ties and links with the host country should be in the fore.
As such, any act necessarily involves an integration of cognition, conation and emotion.
The trilogy of mind: Cognition, affection, and conation. Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences, 16(2), 107-117.
From various classifications of mental activities available, the widest nomenclature was used in this research: the tripartite classification of mental activities (responses) into cognition, affection, and conation. This classification has been in use since the eighteen century and is still widely used nowadays to address various aspects of human mental state and responses [37].
But there is no phenomenological element, nor any conceptual implication, in this sort of color-perception-involving intentionality of any kind of volitional constituent, construed as some form of teleology, conation, desire, want, need, aim, end, goal, purpose, and so on.
Psychologist Ernest Hilgard (1980), for example, focusing on those dimensions proper to his field, demonstrated that over the course of the past two centuries (and possibly as early as antiquity), scholars have described the human psyche in terms of an irreducible "trilogy of mind"--cognition, affection, and conation (p.
We may probably safely follow McDougall further and regard the extension of the instinct of tenderness, with its conation of protection, to other members of the herd as the foundation of charity and benevolence, and, when it is thwarted, of moral indignation by the intrusion of anger: thus of the sense of justice and of the desire that "right" should prevail between all the members of the herd, and ultimately between all the members of the human race.
Neo-Platonists believed God initially created a person's soul, which Plato defined as cognition, emotion, conation, and motivation that always has existed and is imperishable (Burns & Ralph, 1969).
Psychiatrists recognize that schizophrenia is a disorder in which the highest mental functions, such as thought, language, emotions, conation, and cognition, are drastically disrupted.