concert

(redirected from concerts)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms.

concert,

in music, public performance of a group of musical compositions. Originally the word referred simply to a group of musicians playing together; concerts by a solo performer are properly called recitals. The earliest recorded public concerts were organized by a London violinist, John Banister, in 1672. Many orchestral concerts were given in the 18th cent., and early in the 19th cent., which saw great development of concert life; public concerts of chamber music were often given. In the American colonies, the first concert on record took place in Boston in 1731.

Concert

 

a public performance by artists of a definite, pre-arranged program. Concerts may be musical (symphonic, chamber, piano, violin), literary (recitals), or variety (light vocal and instrumental music, humorous stories, skits, and circus acts). Several performers or just one (solo concert) may participate.

In the USSR concerts are organized by concert tour associations—for example, Goskontsert, Soiuzkontsert, Roskontsert, and Moskontsert—and by philharmonic societies on the republic and oblast levels; in capitalist countries this is done by private entrepreneurs (impresarios or managers).

concert

1. 
a. a performance of music by players or singers that does not involve theatrical staging
b. (as modifier): a concert version of an opera
2. in concert
a. (of musicians, esp rock musicians) performing live

Concert

(Concert Communications Services, Reston, VA) A joint venture of AT&T and British Telecom (BT) that provided global communications services, including private, point-to-point voice and data circuits, Internet services and X.25 packet switching and frame relay. In October 2001, AT&T and BT announced their intention to dissolve Concert and return all assets to the parent companies. See Tymnet.
References in classic literature ?
The conversation of the servants, when they assembled before the slowly lighting kitchen fire, referred to a recent family event, and turned at starting on this question: Had Thomas, the footman, seen anything of the concert at Clifton, at which his master and the two young ladies had been present on the previous night?
He was never seen at the theatres, at concerts, or in any place of public resort.
Again, in places of amusement--in the Casino, at concerts, or near the fountain--he was never far from the spot where we were sitting.
She lives quietly, sings at concerts, drives out at five every day, and returns at seven sharp for dinner.
She loved going to concerts, she loved stopping with her cousin, she loved iced coffee and meringues.
It was a standing order, and as she was ill for two years before she died they found forty-eight Worth dresses that had never been taken out of tissue paper; and when the girls left off their mourning they were able to wear the first lot at the Symphony concerts without looking in advance of the fashion.
Bogsby to sing at a series of concerts called Harmonic Assemblies, or Meetings, which it would appear are held at the Sol's Arms under Mr.
She was very musical, playing the guitar and singing in a style that made our shipboard concerts vastly superior to the average of their order; but I have seen her shudder at the efforts of less gifted folks who were also doing their best; and it was the same in other directions where her superiority was less specific.
A man of good sense but of little faith, whose compassion seemed to lead him to church as often as he went there, said to me that "he liked to have concerts, and fairs, and churches, and other public amusements go on.
In the Rue Taitbout were the Concerts Rouge, where for seventy-five centimes they could hear excellent music and get into the bargain something which it was quite possible to drink: the seats were uncomfortable, the place was crowded, the air thick with caporal horrible to breathe, but in their young enthusiasm they were indifferent.
We have taken her to classical concerts and to music HIGGINS.
We do not intend to describe the grand banquet, at which the royal guests were present, nor the concerts, nor the fairy-like and more than magic transformations and metamorphoses; it will be enough for our purpose to depict the countenance the king assumed, which, from being gay, soon wore a very gloomy, constrained, and irritated expression.