concrete anchor


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anchor, anchorage

medieval anchors, 10
anchor, 9
anchors, 1
1. A device such as a metal rod, wire, or strap, for fixing one object to another, as specially formed metal connectors used to fasten together timbers, masonry, trusses, etc.
2. In prestressed concrete, a device to lock the stressed tendon in position so that it will retain its stressed condition.
3. In precast concrete construction, a device used to attach the precast units to the building frame.
4. In slabs on grade, or walls, a device used to fasten to rock or adjacent structures to prevent movement of the slab or wall with respect to the foundation, adjacent structure, or rock.
5. A support which holds one end of a timber fast.
6. A device used to secure a window or doorframe to the building structure; usually adjustable in three dimensions; also see doorframe anchor.
8. The anchor-shaped dart in the egg-and-dart molding; also called anchor dart.
9. A device used in a piping system to secure the piping to a structure; typically provided by a metal insert in an overhead concrete slab or beam.
10. A wrought-iron clamp, of Flemish origin, on the exterior side of a brick building wall that is connected to the opposite wall by a steel tie-rod to prevent the two walls from spreading apart; these clamps were often in the shape of
References in periodicals archive ?
When Gardner arrived on the job site, he realized the importance of removing the existing concrete anchors with safety and care.
9 TIP the walls up and drop them over the concrete anchors. Start with the back wall first.
Six hexagonal concrete anchors have already been placed around the ship and floating barriers we put to limit the spill, which will later be collected by a specialised ship, they added.
The 410 stainless steel Tapcon masonry concrete anchors represent the ultimate in temperature resistance, corrosion, stain and rust, and are considered ideal for harsh environmental conditions.
It can be fixed to the ground with steel or concrete anchors. Despite a small footprint, the domestic module offers maximized space because of its verticality.
Prolonged exposure to silica dust while performing tasks such as installing concrete anchors, core drilling for poke-thru devices, and trenching for wireway can be a serious health hazard.
Three rows of mammoth concrete anchors weigh the terra-quasi-firma in place.