concrete thinking


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concrete thinking

[′käŋ‚krēt ′thiŋk·iŋ]
(psychology)
Mental processes characterized by literalness and the tendency to be bound to the most immediate and obvious sense impressions, as well as by a lack of generalization and abstraction.
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Moreover, other signs of formal thought disorder such as illogicality, concrete thinking, and circumstantiality may occur both in schizophrenia and in individuals with borderline intelligence in absence of psychosis.
McGill from University of Chicago, the authors of the study, insist that abstract thinking and concrete thinking determine the theory consumers adopt to interpret their subjective experiences.
Stanley James comes up with some concrete thinking which is far beyond his years and abilities which make you want to read on and enjoy the rich laughter which is engendered by this lad.
Thus, 33% of our sample is at the concrete thinking stage, and only 39% have developed formal operational schemata.
Concrete thinking, whereby language and perceptions are interpreted literally.
This same evolution from concrete thinking to the potential for abstraction is seen in the frontal lobe development of an individual, from childhood to adulthood.