concrete thinking


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concrete thinking

[′käŋ‚krēt ′thiŋk·iŋ]
(psychology)
Mental processes characterized by literalness and the tendency to be bound to the most immediate and obvious sense impressions, as well as by a lack of generalization and abstraction.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Moreover, other signs of formal thought disorder such as illogicality, concrete thinking, and circumstantiality may occur both in schizophrenia and in individuals with borderline intelligence in absence of psychosis.
Nyad's hours in the water give her a lot of time to separate herself from concrete thinking and exercise her mind in new ways.
"I'm not aware of any concrete thinking or initiatives or discussion in Council working on this liability issue," said Reinhard Priebe, director for internal security at the European Commission's Directorate-General for Home Affairs.
McGill from University of Chicago, the authors of the study, insist that abstract thinking and concrete thinking determine the theory consumers adopt to interpret their subjective experiences.
Stanley James comes up with some concrete thinking which is far beyond his years and abilities which make you want to read on and enjoy the rich laughter which is engendered by this lad.