Concubinage


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Concubinage

 

in Roman law, the cohabitation of a man and woman with intent to enter into matrimony, distinguished from formal marriage and regulated by law.

As a legal institution, concubinage arose under a law enacted in 18 B.C. establishing severe punishment for adultery. The law absolved from punishment only those men cohabiting with women whom they intended to marry but could not because of legal prohibitions. For example, marriages between men of senatorial rank and freedwomen were forbidden by law. Children born in concubinage had limited rights of inheritance and could be legitimized, unlike other children born out of wedlock, who were completely deprived of property rights.

References in periodicals archive ?
longer lived in a concubinage relationship, the Revised Statute was not
The appellants' second argument was that Duval and Hargrave did not enter into a valid common law marriage via a legal concubinage under Mexican law.
Le concubinage a ete peu utilise dans le theatre a cause de la moralite de l'epoque.
The examples included in the text are revelatory--the Austrian legislation (1812, 1868), especially the Civil Code, made the relationship between the founders of a family less regulated by moral and religious norms--"<Undermining> the divine authority as regards marriage and family surely had a negative impact (unquantifiable, unfortunately), during the long and medium term, upon the rise of illegitimacy, concubinage, birth control, abortion and divorce." (13) Clearly said -diminished moral control of the church over the human body favored spreading of birth control, increased number of abortions, finally a negative demographic growth.
(226) According to the National Unity and Reconciliation Commission, polygamy often occurs in the form of concubinage and "presents a non-negligible gravity." (227) When polygamy takes the form of concubinage, men have de facto marriages with several women, creating in essence a polygamous marriage.
Once feminist demands stripped gender inequalities out of the civil code in the 1970s, and laws permitting contraception and abortion gave women control over their maternity, divorces and concubinage soared.
This book provides a unique perspective on attitudes to marriage, concubinage and social mobility amongst the Venetian Patriciate in the late sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.
What happens is that in many West African societies, no one enquires too closely into the exact relationships between people, and slavery can very easily be camouflaged by being transmuted into all manner of otherwise lawful relationships, such as marriage, concubinage or adoption.
There is feminist thinking on all kinds of issues--Li Ju-Chen's satirical critique of foot-binding and concubinage, on Henrik Ibsen's The Doll House, writings by John Stuart Mill, Friedrich Engels, W.E.B.
"Further, for Vacaiius, this debate is not a sterile, academic one; instead it is based on the realities present in the twelfth century: separation, divorce, concubinage, and the clandestine marriages of young girls....
The significance of documenting a relationship as a marriage (as opposed to concubinage) when the spouses were of different classes, noted as a concern in late antiquity, reappears in a study of Renaissance Florence.
Islamic law openly allows for wife-beating, concubinage (a man may have four wives; more if he can afford them), polygyny and sundry other violations of basic human dignity as understood in Christian and modern times (Suras 4:3, 4:34).