condition


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condition

1. an ailment or physical disability
2. Law
a. a declaration or provision in a will, contract, etc., that makes some right or liability contingent upon the happening of some event
b. the event itself
3. Logic a statement whose truth is either required for the truth of a given statement (a necessary condition) or sufficient to guarantee the truth of the given statement (a sufficient condition)
4. Maths Logic a presupposition, esp a restriction on the domain of quantification, indispensable to the proof of a theorem and stated as part of it

condition

[kən′dish·ən]
(mathematics)
The product of the norm of a matrix and of its inverse.
(petroleum engineering)
To change the properties of a drilling mud by introducing additives.
References in classic literature ?
For many a decade past the history of industry and commerce is but the history of the revolt of modern productive forces against modern conditions of production, against the property relations that are the conditions for the existence of the bourgeoisie and of its rule.
They direct their attacks not against the bourgeois conditions of production, but against the instruments of production themselves; they destroy imported wares that compete with their labour, they smash to pieces machinery, they set factories ablaze, they seek to restore by force the vanished status of the workman of the Middle Ages.
The various interests and conditions of life within the ranks of the proletariat are more and more equalised, in proportion as machinery obliterates all distinctions of labour, and nearly everywhere reduces wages to the same low level.
Further, as we have already seen, entire sections of the ruling classes are, by the advance of industry, precipitated into the proletariat, or are at least threatened in their conditions of existence.
The "dangerous class," the social scum, that passively rotting mass thrown off by the lowest layers of old society, may, here and there, be swept into the movement by a proletarian revolution; its conditions of life, however, prepare it far more for the part of a bribed tool of reactionary intrigue.
Thus such conditions are called affections, not qualities.
Such conditions are therefore termed, not qualities, but affections.
Humanity had been strong, energetic, and intelligent, and had used all its abundant vitality to alter the conditions under which it lived.
Under the new conditions of perfect comfort and security, that restless energy, that with us is strength, would become weakness.
Other conditions being equal, if one force is hurled against another ten times its size, the result will be the flight of the former.
Except at the Nile, where the conditions were ideal for engaging a fleet moored in shallow water, Lord Nelson was not lucky in his weather.
It was in those conditions that, at seven on the morning of the