conditional

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conditional

1. 
a. (of an equation or inequality) true for only certain values of the variable: x2 --1 = x + 1 is a conditional equation, only true for x = 2 or --1
b. (of an infinite series) divergent when the absolute values of the terms are considered
2. Logic (of a proposition) consisting of two component propositions associated by the words if…then so that the proposition is false only when the antecedent is true and the consequent false. Usually written: pq or pq, where p is the antecedent, q the consequent, and → or ⊃ symbolizes implies
3. Logic a conditional proposition

conditional

[kən′dish·ən·əl]
(computer science)
Subject to the result of a comparison made during computation in a computer, or subject to human intervention.
References in periodicals archive ?
is acceptable in epistemic or speech-act conditional protases, but is barred in protases of predictive conditionals (p.
The verb-form patterns of nonpredictive conditionals are less restrictive than those of content conditionals.
In concessive conditionals the apodosis is independently asserted, which, in terms of MST, means that no alternative scenario of the situation described in the apodosis is presented.
Chapter 7 tackles clause-order in conditionals and other constructions with an adverbial clause.
173), and is typically used in content, epistemic, and speech-act conditionals.
207), and that then does not occur in the apodosis of such conditionals.
However, I will also show that, although USED in ways very similar to the Japanese and Korean constructions above, the MEANING of como conditionals in Spanish does not encode attitudinal "negativity," but rather the assessment that the condition expressed would typically be considered "insufficient" for the consequent expressed.
Section 3 reviews prior analyses of the construction, based on the notion of counterexpectation, and demonstrates their inadequacy via the analysis of a number of naturally occurring examples of como conditionals.
Formally, como conditionals differ from causal sentences headed by como only with respect to the mood of the verb form in the subordinate clause.
What (7a) shows is that si-marked conditionals can be used even when the condition is "taken for granted": the hypotheticality or "irrealisness" typically associated with si conditionals is merely a (generalized) conversational implicature, which can be canceled in an appropriate discourse context (Schwenter 1999).
There is also an asymmetry between the two conditional constructions when we examine their use in speech-act conditionals (Sweetser 1990).
A particular characteristic of speech-act conditionals is that they permit apodoses with nondeclarative sentence structure.

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