behavior therapy

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behavior therapy

behavior therapy or behavior modification, in psychology, treatment of human behavioral disorders through the reinforcement of acceptable behavior and suppression of undesirable behavior. The technique had its roots in the work of Ivan Pavlov, a Russian physiologist who observed that animals could be taught to respond to stimuli that might otherwise have no effect on them. B. F. Skinner developed the technique in the United States, using positive or negative reinforcers to encourage desirable behavior and punishments to discourage undesirable behavior. Behavior therapists believe that, in many cases, behaviors can be learned or unlearned through basic conditioning techniques; unlike traditional psychoanalysis, the method has little regard for the unconscious processes underlying personality disorders. Behavior therapy uses such techniques as aversive conditioning, where unwanted habits are paired with unpleasant stimuli, and systematic desensitization, where a stimulus that causes anxiety is paired with a pleasant one.
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behavior therapy

[bi′hāv·yər ‚ther·ə·pē]
(psychology)
A mode of therapy that focuses on altering observable and quantifiable behavior of an individual by means of systematic manipulation of environmental and behavioral variables that are thought to be functionally related to the individual's behavior.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Serum E-Selectin Levels before Start of Conditioning Therapy Show No Significant Associations with LaterAcute GVHD.
Thus, our present study is the only one to suggest an association between the endothelial cell status prior to conditioning therapy and risk of later acute GVHD.
However, most experts strongly recommend that plants and dried or fresh flowers not be allowed in the hospital rooms of HSCT recipients or candidates undergoing conditioning therapy because Aspergillus spp.
Play areas for pediatric HSCT recipients and candidates undergoing conditioning therapy should be cleaned and disinfected weekly and as needed [BIII].
Immunizations are needed to prevent transmission of vaccine-preventable diseases to HSCT recipients and candidates undergoing conditioning therapy. In general, health-care workers should be immune to measles, mumps, rubella, and especially varicella and influenza.
Visitors who have communicable infectious diseases such as upper respiratory infection or flulike illness, recent exposure to communicable diseases, an active shingles rash (whether covered or not), a Varicella zoster-like rash within 6 weeks of receiving a chickenpox vaccine, or a history of receiving an oral polio vaccine within the previous 3 to 6 weeks should not be allowed to enter the HSCT unit or have direct contact with HSCT recipients or candidates undergoing conditioning therapy [AII].