airway

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airway

1. an air route, esp one that is fully equipped with emergency landing fields, navigational aids, etc.
2. a passage down which air travels from the nose or mouth to the lungs
3. Med a tubelike device inserted via the throat to keep open the airway of an unconscious patient

Airway

 

an approved route for regular flights of transport planes. The route is provided with maintained airfields and with the necessary ground-support equipment (radio beacons, air lane identification markers, and the like) to insure safe takeoff and landing. Civil aviation flights are generally carried out on airways. In some special cases—for instance, when servicing expeditions or rendering emergency medical assistance—flights are carried out independent of any airway. The first Soviet airway was inaugurated in 1923 between Moscow and Nizhnii Novgorod (now called Gorky). In 1968 more than 2,500 airways (with a total extent of about 500,000 km) constituted the consolidated network of the USSR Aeroflot system, linking about 3,500 cities and populated points within the country and 44 foreign countries.

airway

[′er‚wā]
(building construction)
A passage for ventilation between thermal insulation and roof boards.
(mining engineering)
A passage for air in a mine. Also known as air course.
(navigation)
A designated route of passage for aircraft.

airway

airway
A passage for ventilation between thermal insulation and roof boards.

airway

airwayclick for a larger image
Some of the legends on airways for aeronautical charts.
A control area, or a portion thereof, established in the form of a corridor (ICAO). An airway is equipped with radio navigation aids. It is a path through navigable airspace designated by the appropriate authority within which air traffic services are provided.
References in periodicals archive ?
BPA exposure during late gestation accelerates secretory cell maturation in the proximal conducting airways.
Within the conducting airways, both mucins and Clara cell secretory protein (CCSP) have roles in airway disease (Ramsay et al.
Removal of particles from the conducting airways (nose to respiratory bronchioles) is carried out by "mucociliary clearance," helped by airway secretions.
We found fibers on the surfaces of conducting airways and alveoli.
2] in the intrapulmonary conducting airways was obtained from particle deposition studies in hamsters (Geiser et al.
1989; Weibel 1984) has been shown to well preserve the surface-lining layer with its phagocytic cells and the surfactant film at the air-liquid interface of intrapulmonary conducting airways and alveoli in laboratory animals (Geiser et al.
Predominant pathological effects were also confined to the epithelial and interstitial tissue compartments of the respiratory bronchioles, forming the transitional zone between the conducting airways and gas-exchange regions of the lungs.
This region of the lung is anatomically distinct, as the respiratory bronchioles have some of the same properties of conducting airways as well as serving a gas-exchange function (25).
The relative absence of retained particulate matter in the larger conducting airways probably reflects more rapid clearance of particles deposited in these regions.