conduction current

conduction current

[kən′dək·shən ‚kər·ənt]
(solid-state physics)
A current due to a flow of conduction electrons through a body.
References in periodicals archive ?
[6] reported that the e' and conduction current of thin films of polymides on substrates with thicknesses of 80-2,000 nm were measured by using a small electrode system.
At the next instant, the conduction current with the corresponding density J begins to influence the distribution of the electric field in the layers
The dependence of conduction current on the irradiation intensity under constant electric field strength ([I.sub.X]-[i.sub.XRC]) is referred to as the lux-ampere characteristic (LAC), while the dependence of luminescence intensity on the excitation intensity ([I.sub.X]-[J.sub.XRL]) is referred to as the lux-luminescent characteristic (LLC).
where [mathematical expression not reproducible] is the conduction loss of the per device, d([omega]t) is the duty cycle, [U.sub.com](i) represents the conduction voltage drop of the IGBT, [I.sub.com] denotes the conduction current peak of the IGBT, and [omega] is the angle speed.
The volume of IgE in PBS, initial current ([I.sub.0]) (when no gate voltage is applied), Dirac voltage, and minimum conduction current are shown in Table 2.
This is actually a periodic conduction current within the particles causing a periodic polarization field around the particles--both periods being equal to that of the incident radiation.
36], and electric conduction current is the "transference of electrification" [1, Art.
[21] denote that (1) the on state loss is proportional to forward voltage drop and conduction current, while the forward voltage drop will increase along with the conduction current increasing; (2) the switching loss increases along with the DC bus voltage raise.
The conduction current of insulators at normal applied electric field will be very small because their conductivities are inherently low, on the order of [10.sup.-2] ~[10.sup.-8] [[OMEGA].sup.-1] [cm.sup.-1].
The magnetic dipole moment [m.sub.e] appearing in the previous section is an excess dipole moment, computed from the conduction current (call it [J.sub.e] here) only and not dependent on the permeabilities of the half spaces.
As illustrated in FIGURE 2, Ohm's Law relates conduction current to voltage drop, and at DC, the relation coefficient is a constant representing the resistance of the conductor.
(5) In order to gain deeper understanding of the loss physics and to evaluate the spatial distribution of such losses at high frequencies, the displacement and conduction current fields (in the frequency domain) have been extracted from the simulations.