conductive hearing loss


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Related to conductive hearing loss: sensorineural hearing loss

conductive hearing loss

[kən‚dək·tiv ′hir·iŋ ‚lȯs]
(physiology)
Failure of sound to be transmitted properly to the receptors in the inner ear so that sounds must be made louder to be heard.
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Similar findings were also noted by Sarojamma and Ravi where majority of patients (62% and 60%) presented with conductive hearing loss in the range of 26-35dB (mild degree conductive hearing loss).9, 11 The result of this study in terms of degree of hearing loss was also consistent with Raj, Rehman, Singh and Khan's study where mild degree hearing loss was reported 66.66%, 49.45%, 66.66% and 62% rrespectively.13-16
Thus, the findings of the present study disagree with the aforementioned studies, and it is believed that because the children in the studied sample presented conductive hearing loss, increasing the differences between the behavioral and electrophysiological evaluation due to the greater instability of the responses to the conductive impairment.
Pure Tone Audiometry (PTA) was performed on all 135 cases with 76 (56.3 Percent) cases of conductive hearing loss and 18 (13.3 Percent) of patients with pure sensory neural hearing loss, and 27 (20 Percent) cases had mixed deafness.
After a period of active surveillance, her glue ear resolved, but she continued to have a hearing deficit, with a right-sided mild conductive hearing loss with thresholds of ~40 dB.
Audiologic tests such as comparative measurements of air- and bone conduction thresholds help distinguish a conductive hearing loss from a disorder of the sensori-neural type.
A further cause of a conductive hearing loss is ossicular chain disruption after trauma.
Earlier, speakers pointed out that there are three types of hearing impairments: Conductive hearing loss occurs when sound is not conducted efficiently through the outer ear canal to the eardrum and the tiny bones, or ossicles, of the middle ear.
(1,3,4) It is one of the most common causes of progressive conductive hearing loss among adult Caucasians.
Conductive hearing loss typically involves a problem in the outer or middle ear and requires medical intervention and is generally very treatable.
It also includes congenital permanent bilateral, unilateral sensory, and permanent conductive hearing loss.
The average degree of hearing loss ranged from minimal conductive hearing loss to moderately severe conductive hearing loss.