condyle

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Related to condylar: condylar joint

condyle

[′kän‚dīl]
(anatomy)
A rounded bone prominence that functions in articulation.
(botany)
The antheridium of certain stoneworts.
(invertebrate zoology)
A rounded, articular process on arthropod appendages.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Management of type-a supracondylar fractures of femur with Dynamic Condylar Screw (DCS).
Condylar axis position, as determined by the occlusion and measured by the CPI instrument, and signs and symptoms of temporomandibular dysfunction.
Effects of early bilateral mandibular first molar extraction on condylar and ramal vertical asymmetry.
The most lateral points of the condylar image and the ascending ramus were connected with a line that was traced between them.
It is considered that repeated forceful yawning may cause a slight dislocation of restricted joint ligaments with the passage of time, consequently an increased range of condylar movement results which indicates it as a predisposing factor.
Guralnick, "Internal derangements of the temporomandibular joint: An assessment of condylar position in centric occlusion," Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry, vol.
Treatment options of intracranial condylar dislocation consist of closed reduction and open reduction, with or without reconstruction of the glenoid fossa.
ORIF for both left Le Fort II and condylar fracture was also planned.
The purpose of this in vivo study was to investigate the position of mandibular condyles during wearing of occlusal splint with the use of the ultrasound jaw tracking device with six degrees of freedom, and to determine the influence of splint thickness on the condylar position.
Placement of fat grafts around the head of the condylar components to decrease tissue exposure to alloy components has been previously proposed by some authors (10, 11), and although this approach is reasonable, there is no objective scientific evidence to support the hypotheses.
The presence of advancement devices seems to induce adaptive changes in the condylar cartilage (Liu, Kaneko, & Soma, 2007a; Sato, Muramoto, & Soma, 2006), glenoid fossa and articular eminence (Liu, Kaneko, & Soma, 2007b; Tuominen, Kantomaa, Pirttiniemi, & Poikela, 1996; Woodside, Metaxas, & Altuna, 1987), but little has been described about the effects of PDT.