configuration

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configuration

1. Physics Chem
a. the shape of a molecule as determined by the arrangement of its atoms
b. the structure of an atom or molecule as determined by the arrangement of its electrons and nucleons
2. Psychol the unit or pattern in perception studied by Gestalt psychologists
3. Computing the particular choice of hardware items and their interconnection that make up a particular computer system

configuration

(kon-fig-yŭ-ray -shŏn) See aspect.

Configuration

The form of a figure as determined by the arrangement of its parts, outline, or contour.

configuration

see FIGURATION.

Configuration

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

Traditionally, the term configuration was used to refer to any aspect. In contemporary astrology, the term is reserved for sets of interrelated aspects involving three or more planets, such as T-squares, grand trines, and so forth. By extension, the configuration is sometimes used to refer to the pattern presented by the entire horoscope.

Configuration

 

(of molecules). In stereochemistry the configuration characterizes the spatial arrangement of atoms or groups of atoms in an asymmetric atom, in an asymmetrically substituted double bond, in a small (rigid) ring, and in the central atom of complex compounds.

The differences in configuration are determined by the existence of two types of stable stereoisomers: geometrical and optical isomers. Chemical and particularly physical methods of investigation are widely used in determining the configuration of molecules. Thus, using a special X-ray technique, it has been possible to demonstrate, for example, the spatial arrangement of substituents around asymmetric carbon atoms (designated by asterisks) in a molecule of tartaric acid—dextrorotatory (I) and levorotatory (II):

The configuration of a molecule does not alter with changes in its conformation, that is, the rotation of individual parts of a molecule relative to one another about single bonds. Sometimes (for example, in the chemistry and physical chemistry of macromolecular compounds), the term “configuration” is used in a broader sense to include the entire spatial model of a molecule.

V. M. POTAPOV

configuration

[kən‚fig·yə′rā·shən]
(aerospace engineering)
A particular type of specific aircraft, rocket, or such, which differs from others of the same model by the arrangement of its components or by the addition or omission of auxiliary equipment; for example, long-range configuration or cargo configuration.
(chemistry)
The three-dimensional spatial arrangement of atoms in a stable or isolable molecule.
(computer science)
For a computer system, the relationship of hardware elements to each other, and the manner in which they are electronically connected.
(electricity)
A group of components interconnected to perform a desired circuit function.
(mathematics)
An arrangement of geometric objects.
(mechanics)
The positions of all the particles in a system.
(systems engineering)
A group of machines interconnected and programmed to operate as a system.

configuration

The spatial arrangement of wood particles, chips, flakes, or fibers used in particleboard, fiberboard, etc.

configuration (as applied to the airplane)

A particular combination of the position of the moveable elements, such as wing flaps, landing gear, etc., which affect the aerodynamic characteristics of the airplane (ICAO).

configuration

The makeup of a system. To "configure software" means selecting programmable options that make the program function to the user's liking. To "configure hardware" means assembling desired components for a custom system as well as selecting options in the user-programmable parts of the system. "Configurability" refers to the hardware or software's ability to be changed and customized. See settings.
References in periodicals archive ?
A model of the spatial system of selected informal settlement constructed for the configurational analysis what in space syntax approach is called an axial map.
Previous research has discussed the potential advantages of a configurational approach to analysis of constructs such as HPWP, which are conceptualized as most effective when "bundled" together as complementary sets of policies and practices (Meyer, Tsui, and Hinings 1993; Fiss 2011).
Theoretical Frameworks in Strategic Human Resource Management: Universalistic, Contingency, and Configurational Perspectives.
Table 1: Configurational energy per particle for each of the solvents studied in this study Solvent (pure) Energy per particle (kcal/mol) Water -5.
A configurational theory of generic meaning in architecture, and it's limits, is architectural form meaningless?
Mill's method is suitable for configurational theory (where institutions are viewed as interdependent configurations rather than in isolation) since it explicitly conceptualizes cases as combinations of attributes.
A tactile map has a greater potential for accessing the configurational layout of the map scene and, in our scenario, the seamarks.
Patel reminds a reader that musical meter involves temporal periodicity, and poetic meter is based upon configurational periodicity.
Similarly, in the spatial domain, most studies considered configurational meaning aspects only, probably because of the focus on lexical means.
The second volume, on materials characterization, computation, modeling and energy, contains papers from 15 symposia addressing topics that include crystal defects; fuels enabling future fusion, fission and hybrid reactor systems; composite, cellular, and natural materials; computational thermodynamics and kinetics; configurational thermodynamics of materials; and clean power systems, among others.
Therefore, new concepts such as higher order stresses and configurational forces emerged to circumvent this condition and to understand the thermodynamic compatibility of successful material models [4-6].

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