conflation


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conflation

(database)
Combining or blending of two or more versions of a text; confusion or mixing up. Conflation algorithms are used in databases.

References in periodicals archive ?
From an objective standpoint, this conflation is simply incorrect.
In addition to bandwidth shaping and market data conflation, NovaTick also provides the ability to aggregate trades and publish snapshots.
In this piece, using personal narratives from my undergraduate, masters, and PhD tutoring experiences, as well as data collected from a small study conducted in a mid-sized Midwestern university, I will illuminate the ways that non-directive and student-centered tutoring are conflated, and I will provide some insights for how I hope to address this conflation in the future as a writing center director.
Only by unpacking its conflation with 'law and order' will they realize its emancipatory power.
115 and 116, the regulation authority rejected any conflation of professional errors and terrorist acts stipulated by the anti-terror law.
For one NPR host, the idea that Sanders was Jewish and had spent time on a kibbutz meant that he probably held an Israeli passport, an instinctive conflation of Jewishness and foreign loyalties that might have once been more common on the right.
The author has organized the main body of his text in five chapters, covering automobility and the gay cityscape, the lingering impact of the conflation of homosexuality, lower-class status, and transvestism or effeminacy, transnational transit and the circuits of privilege, and other related subjects.
He may be confusing the issue with the 2005 Treaty of Lisbon and the promise by Gordon Brown to hold a referendum and his subsequent refusal on the grounds that it was not a new treaty but a conflation of previous agreements into one document.
For use by archivists and librarians, this selection of correspondence by McQuaid, the Archbishop of Dublin between 1940 and 1972, seeks to illustrate the conflation of McQuaid's generous private and vicious public lives.
Examining a small number of pertinent works, Adams exposes the American citizen's conflation of war with manhood, the wider American cultural paradigm that enables the mythologized equivalence between these two terms, and most stolidly, the disjuncture between civilian perceptions of war's relationship with masculinity and the disruptive narratives his examined texts offer to counter these popular perceptions.