confounding


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confounding

[kən′fau̇nd·iŋ]
(statistics)
Method used in design of factorial experiments in which some information about higher-order interaction is sacrificed so that estimates of main effects in lower-order interactions can be more precise.
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, we attempt to more clearly define postrandomization confounding so that we are able to give serious consideration to this potential bias resource.
Although investigators may acknowledge weaknesses in the study design (such as residual confounding from unmeasured covariates), these factors do not necessarily invalidate the study conclusions.
13-15] The aim of the review is to extend the literature with the understanding of time-varying third variable model by elucidating the concept of time-dependent confounding variable and how to adjust those variables to infer the association between exposure and outcome.
Keim cautions that these results do not apply to preterm children and don't account for all possible confounding factors.
After controlling for confounding factors, patients with a body mass index (BMI) of 25 kg/[m.
The latter investigators interpreted the association as possibly due to limited control of confounding, selection biases, and/or reverse causality.
A similar scenario plays out with the confounding Penchant to Drift, an image of a series of painted vertical elements that seem to blossom into three dimensions at both the top of the composition, where they appear to coalesce into a kind of white mesa, and its bottom, where they unravel into a tangle of white and robin's egg blue tape.
In this respect, higher unemployment is not all bad (however confounding it may be to old-line economists).
The ST1 hypothesis not only explains the mechanisms behind the lifestyle risk factors discussed above, namely by confounding with sexual behavior, but also why TB has ceased to be a major cause of death in Western societies.
That is a part of the larger skilled-trades shortage confounding a number of industries," says McGee.
gov) cites a variety of methodological problems, including inadequate comparisons and the failure to control for confounding variables.
SFAS 150, which deals with accounting for equity at private companies, has emerged as one of the more confounding rules of recent years--"a triumph of theory over economic reality," argues valuation expert Alfred King.