confounding

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confounding

[kən′fau̇nd·iŋ]
(statistics)
Method used in design of factorial experiments in which some information about higher-order interaction is sacrificed so that estimates of main effects in lower-order interactions can be more precise.
References in periodicals archive ?
Let's say, for instance, that long-time journalists can be confoundingly oblivious to the vast opportunities of the digital world and insufferably sure that their way is the only way.
Dr Reid said: "Being obese can cause death, but confoundingly losing weight can also cause cardiac arrhythmia.
Spend enough time in and around this church at just about any level and one consistent and striking reality that becomes apparent is how confoundingly complex an organism it is.
Femininity, which men would have fixed and instantly intelligible, is essentially and confoundingly theatrical, superficial--mobile, changing, unknowable--and precisely because of the way those same men have constructed it.
Then explain this: How come the people who run the game of hockey seem to be so confoundingly civil?
For example: the writer who is inventive enough to think of it can offer a statement as confoundingly simple as the one pronounced in "The Barricade" section of The Tunnel--"Things are our only feelings"--to describe the limitations on our apprehension of the infinite range of representation.
Confoundingly, Spitzer sees much smaller quantities of dust than SCUBA did.
Although I sympathize with his despair over what results when working-class individuals confoundingly, and to their own detriment, display a preference for the rich and privileged, I was surprised by Frank's pointed lack of discussion related to the Democratic Party's failure to address working-class concerns substantively.
Goodman often contrasts tones of two dominant colors; for example, shades of aqua paired with shades of red, or of acid green pitted against orange, to exacerbate the tension caused by images that fluctuate easily between forms that are immediately recognizable and forms that are confoundingly abstract.
Maybe this confoundingly elusive condition is illusive, my mind's hoax on a trickable (but not treatable) body.
The possibility that her life did not have to end this way is supported by textual evidence that this limited identity is to a large extent forced on Martha by others around her, and, even more confoundingly, that readers cannot be completely sure what Martha thinks of herself, since, yet again, narrated monolog is used to render this last self-view.
Throughout the volume, the only illustrations provided are in black and white, often in confoundingly small format.