conifer

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conifer

conifer (kŏnˈĭfûr) [Lat.,=cone-bearing], tree or shrub of the order Coniferales, e.g., the pine, monkey-puzzle tree, cypress, and sequoia. Most conifers bear cones and most are evergreens, though a few, such as the larch, are deciduous. Conifers are widely distributed over the world but are mostly found in the highlands of temperate regions. The conifers, the ginkgoes, and the cycads comprise the three most important groups of gymnosperms, i.e., plants without true flowers. Conifers are classified in the division Pinophyta, class Pinopsida.
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conifer

A tree belonging to the botanical group which bears cones; it includes all the softwoods used in building, particularly the pines and firs. See also: Wood
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

conifer

[′kän·ə·fər]
(botany)
The common name for plants of the order Pinales.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

conifer

A cone-bearing tree or shrub of the gymnospermous order; a softwood which includes cypress, firs, pines, and spruce.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

conifer

any gymnosperm tree or shrub of the phylum Coniferophyta, typically bearing cones and evergreen leaves. The group includes the pines, spruces, firs, larches, yews, junipers, cedars, cypresses, and sequoias
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Effects of soil fauna on leaching of nitrogen and phosphorus from experimental systems simulating coniferous forest floor.
By May of 1980 they had the initial members of a cooperative dedicated to conserving the genetic resources in the region's coniferous forests.