conjugal family


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Related to conjugal family: Consanguineal family

conjugal family

the FAMILY form consisting of a heterosexual pair and dependent children. Compare EXTENDED FAMILY.
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53-72), Triimper being open to the idea that wealthier households may have accommodated extended family groups, while Dickmann starts from the Saller and Shaw line that the conjugal family unit was the norm.
Thus, the suppression of the most egalitarian elements in Republican family law and the removal of civil rights from women in favor of a reinforced domesticity and patriarchal ideals strengthened the conjugal family but marked the retreat of male citizens into the private sphere as well.
This optimism is of course justified by the fact that the novel takes places in Switzerland, a protestant society which reinforces the emotional bonds of the conjugal family by allowing divorce.
The potentiality for economic growth in the semiperiphery probably is not enhanced by the wholesale adoption of Western conjugal family structures.
A composite measure summarizes several specific observations and represents a more general dimension, such as the ideal typical "Western conjugal family." Composites are especially useful when no single measure adequately captures the dimension of interest.
She does so with chapters on sutlers and other contractors, wives and children of combatants (the conjugal family), servants, slaves, and volunteers (the extended family), and civilian and military personnel who performed staff functions ranging from the supply of food, clothing, and transportation to the provision of medical and hospital care.
The conjugal family is better understood not as the nuclear family but as the samande plus husband/father.
The Federal Secretariat for the IYF and the Canada Committee for the IYF have already produced some literature, including a helpful diagram showing our planet surrounded by eight fluffy clouds - one each for the nuclear family, the conjugal family, the extended, the modified-extended, the single-parent, and patrilineal and the matriarchal family.
Her husband assumed legal responsibility for her when she married."(4) A few pages later he reiterates that "single adult women were normally under the guardianship of their fathers or brothers, with tutelage reverting more generally to the kindred if males of the conjugal family were dead or incompetent."(5)
With a brawny sense of anticipation, Goode indicated that the privatization of the conjugal family is a necessary and developmental outcome of the changes brought about by industrialization and urbanization (Goode, 1963).
Thus "the families of the Bahian upper classes, through a series of small steps, transformed their patriarchal family values to those of the conjugal family".