conjunctive

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conjunctive

Logic relating to, characterized by, or containing a conjunction
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Future research on how frames overlap and vary within specific institutions and within individual articles would highlight how distinct news frames may work conjunctively to craft messages.
The [I.sub.2]/KI potential, KMn[O.sub.4] microtitration, and [H.sub.2][O.sub.2] potential methods were used to conjunctively detect the TAC of serum (Z (M)).
Union of India AIR 1968 SC 662, a Constitutional bench of the Supreme Court had held that the expression "establish and administer" used in Article 30(1) was to be read conjunctively. That is to say, two requirements have to be fulfilled under the said Article.
Meanwhile, crop water status is determined conjunctively by the soil moisture content and air aridity (Jones et al., 1985; Wang et al., 2010; Belko, et al., 2013; Conaty, et al., 2014).
Though F1 is at a lower level than F2, F1 and T1 conjunctively may be useful for evaluating the subtle influence on the forefoot or metatarsophalangeal joints.
I think agriculture uses water conjunctively, a combination of both surface and groundwater."
Finally, genetic algorithm was conjunctively used to search the optimized setting values of the three variables in order to obtain the least power consumption of the equipment under the various load conditions.
If the county is not known, the indictment or information may charge venue in two or more counties conjunctively and proof that the crime was committed in that area shall be sufficient; but before pleading the accused may elect in which of those counties the trial will take place.
6 requires reading it conjunctively with section 5: section 5 states a general rule involving two conditions and section 6 states a particular rule that changes one of both of those conditions.
But it is worth highlighting that one can find doctrinal contexts in which the premises connect to the conclusion disjunctively, instead of conjunctively. In fact, many if not most appeals take this form, when the appellant relies upon independent errors in the decision appealed from, any one of which will be sufficient to have the decision set aside: