Connotation

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Connotation

 

an additional, attendant meaning of a linguistic unit.

Connotation includes semantic or stylistic elements which are connected in a certain way with the basic meaning and are superimposed upon it. Connotation is used to express emotional and evaluative nuances. For example, the word metel’ “snowstorm,” which denotes a strong wind with snow, can be used connotatively in such combinations as pukh kruzhilsia metel’iu, “the down swirled around like a snowstorm,” and metel’ ognennykh iskr vzvilas’ v nebo, “a shower (literally, snowstorm) of fiery sparks soared skyward.” The idea of connotation includes an element of the word’s grammatical meaning that predicts the occurrence of another word in the text (for example, a preposition predicts a noun in a certain case). The notion of connotation in this sense was introduced into linguistics by K. Bühler.

References in periodicals archive ?
In ruling for the taxpayer, the Court noted that the term "right" connotes an "ascertainable and legally enforceable power" and the purported rights Byrum retained--i.
Such adjustments need not connote unsteadiness of purpose, or an excessively activist hand on the wheel, or an attempt to "fine tune" the economy in the sense of trying to achieve an outcome with unrealistic precision.
But years ago, insurers were most likely to associate themselves with a landmark, a symbol, an animal or design to connote their strength, stability and reliability.
Walking between the pylons in one direction, one reads single words stencilled on each column that connote the life of the former tribal group like 'path', 'wind', 'mountain' and 'earth'.
Noting that the commonly understood meaning of the pollution exclusion should not differ between first- and third-party insurance policies, the court held that the pollution exclusion does not "clearly and unmistakably apply" to contamination by leakage within a processing machine, as the words "release, discharge or dispersal" connote a spread beyond the owner's premises to the outside air, land or water.
Something seems amiss here, and not only because the recommended romantic offerings also connote apology.
The term Realtor has come to connote competency, fairness and high integrity resulting from adherence to stringent moral and ethical conduct in business relations.
Signs like these posted on guardhouses, beachfronts, walls, and fences of the growing number of exclusive resorts and residential communities along the Atlantic coast connote welcome to some, exclusion to many.
Rehabilitation professionals must avoid terms that connote pathology, deviance, and abnormality when describing the adaptation to disability process.
In sum, to call a ruler "shepherd" was to connote a person of the polar opposite character and function to the meek figure often depicted in popular art based on Psalm 23.
The monolithic form is barely relieved by rows of slit-like windows and an entrance porch cut into its south-east corner, where (as with Veenman), surreally oversized letters connote the name of the building's distinguished patron.
Worst of all, the very adjective gay will be perceived negatively--not because of homophobia but because so many readers will be fed up with a term that has increasingly come to connote hackneyed sentimentality, propaganda, rage without issue.