Associate

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associate

[ə′sō·sē‚āt]
(psychology)
An item or event that is linked to another in the mind of an individual.

Associate

Closely connected as in function or office, but having secondary or subordinate status; an architect who has an arrangement with another architect to collaborate in the performance of service for a project, or a series of projects.

associate

In an architectural firm, a member of an architect’s staff who has a special employment agreement.
References in periodicals archive ?
Putting it in Schutz's terms, the idea that "saying-values-over-writing" is emerging in the intersubjective discursive present within the world of consociates of Socrates and Phaedrus.
Within a year a membership committee was in place and the first consociate newsletter was printed.
If one assumes that the choice is embedded in a convergence of specific forms of power and meaning in the Jimi road system, then the practices of mobility of my consociates assume the character of an ethnic strategy in civic space.
As the abortion case severely demonstrates through its deep value chasm, the morality of pluralism, and the legitimacy described by discursive legalism restricts the range of instances where legal consociates in a form of life can be genuinely considered both the authors and addressees of their own laws.
are the site where a rational will can take shape, then the legitimacy of law ultimately depends on a communicative arrangement: as participants in rational discourses, consociates under law must be able to examine whether a contested norm meets with, or could meet with, the agreement of all those affected" (1996, 103-4).
Other common names for associates, depending on the religious order, are consociates, coworkers, affiliates and co-journers.
Instead of beginning with a system of rights which supposedly precedes human association, he begins from the perspective of consociates of a form of life who are embedded in structures of communicative action, that is, of linguistically mediated forms of interaction based on the ability of hearer and speaker to accept or reject the validity claims of mutual speech acts.
8) Rather than being the basis for all social action, however, 'clan' identities appear to have been among various means by which consociates sought to project varying forms of autonomy and relatedness within the social, political and economic life of regional communities (see Myers 1986; Martin 1993).
In making him the object of their dissatisfaction, Luritja have found an extremely effective buffer--his presence relieves people of having to directly confront their own kin or consociates for the part they may have played in making particular decisions.
In this way, consociates or family were not alienated.
Here I want to look at this extension of the imagery of kinship to consociates outside of what was termed, in recent Native Title proceedings, the 'cultural domain' of Indigenous people of the northern Kimberley.
But, most importantly, he had many resentments and attachments binding him to his living relatives and consociates.