console

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console

1. an ornamental bracket, esp one used to support a wall fixture, bust, etc.
2. the part of an organ comprising the manuals, pedals, stops, etc.
3. a unit on which the controls of an electronic system are mounted
4. same as games console
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Console

A vertical decorative bracket in the form of a scroll, projecting from a wall to support a cornice, window, or a piece of sculpture.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

console

[′kän‚sōl]
(computer science)
The section of a computer that is used to control the machine manually, correct errors, manually revise the contents of storage, and provide communication in other ways between the operator or service engineer and the central processing unit. Also known as master console.
A display terminal together with its keyboard.
(engineering)
A main control desk for electronic equipment, as at a radar station, radio or television station, or airport control tower. Also known as control desk.
A large cabinet for a radio or television receiver, standing on the floor rather than on a table.
A grouping of controls, indicators, and similar items contained in a specially designed model cabinet for floor mounting; constitutes an operator's permanent working position.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

console

console, 1
1. A decorative bracket in the form of a vertical scroll, projecting from a wall to support a cornice, a door or window head, a piece of sculpture, etc.; an ancon.
2. The cabinet from which an organ is played, including the keyboards, pedals, stops, etc.
3. A panel control desk or cabinet containing dials, meters, switches, and other apparatus for controlling mechanical, hydro-mechanical, or electrical equipment.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

console

console
i. That portion of aircraft cockpit in which many of the operating controls are located. The control console is normally in the form of a pedestal, which extends out from the instrument panel between the pilot's and the co-pilot's seats.
ii. In radar, this refers to radarscope as in a controller's console.
iii. A control station for any major device or system. Normally, such a console is for the seated.
iv. A control station as in the instructor's console in a simulator.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

console

(1)
The operator's station of a mainframe. In times past, this was a privileged location that conveyed godlike powers to anyone with fingers on its keys. Under Unix and other modern time-sharing operating systems, such privileges are guarded by passwords instead, and the console is just the tty the system was booted from. Some of the mystique remains, however, and it is traditional for sysadmins to post urgent messages to all users from the console (on Unix, /dev/console).

console

(2)
On microcomputer Unix boxes, the main screen and keyboard (as opposed to character-only terminals talking to a serial port). Typically only the console can do real graphics or run X. See also CTY.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

console

(1) The physical control panel on a computer or electronic device.

(2) A game machine. See video game console.

(3) A terminal or desktop computer used to monitor and control a network.

(4) Any display terminal.

(5) The user interface on any monitoring, management or control system. See Microsoft Management Console, HMI and OI.


Consoles that Were Consoles!
Up until the late 1970s, computers were designed with panels of blinking lights, which added to their aura of science fiction. The designs gave each computer a personality that is lacking in many of today's machines. (Top image courtesy of The Computer Museum History Center. Bottom image courtesy of Unisys Corporation.)


Consoles that Were Consoles!
Up until the late 1970s, computers were designed with panels of blinking lights, which added to their aura of science fiction. The designs gave each computer a personality that is lacking in many of today's machines. (Top image courtesy of The Computer Museum History Center. Bottom image courtesy of Unisys Corporation.)







Go Back a Few Decades
In 1951, the UNIVAC I had a very impressive console. Check out the typewriter output (right) and the oscilloscope (left). (Image courtesy of Rare Book & Manuscript Library, University of Pennsylvania.)
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in periodicals archive ?
In Chaucer's Knight's Tale, Boethian and Augustinian ideas are explicitly juxtaposed and a story from ancient history offers Chaucer's contemporaries a consolatory narrative form of the type where, after a climactic break--Arcite's death--a post-history is created by decisive, imitative action to fill the gap.
The only requirement for a person to be considered for release on medical parole is therefore written evidence from the treating medical practitioner that he or she has diagnosed the prisoner as being in the final phase of any terminal disease or condition, so that such a release on parole or correctional supervision will enable that person to die a consolatory and dignified death.
Today, post-9/11 rhetoric continues to advocate the same sort of consolatory mourning as that which followed World War I.
She said it should also offer them a consolatory payment in recognition of the 'outrage, distress, inconvenience and uncertainty' they had endured.
Characters with beautiful deformations--the boy with keys for fingers or the shapeshifting child--are revealed as consolatory and illuminating disfigurements: "Make yourself a structure you can live inside." This is good advice, but failing to erect one's own structure, a reader might live for a time in Bender's fabulous house of fiction.
And when the two lock horns in Christchurch in 13 days, Woodward will be hoping to send the same consolatory message to the Kiwi coach.
The family, now living in Croydon, have had pounds 1,000 back from the CSA so far - plus a pounds 100 "consolatory award".
Hardly idyllic though, aside from the prologue about the city of Lahore, "The Girl Next Door" in the Punjab country stands barefoot, mercilessly examined: "The soles of her broad, coarse feet / Are black with the filth of the alleys." "At the Helm of My Life," about smoking hookah, is probably the most well-handled rural appendage inspiring an exceptional sally; smoking the gurgling "bitter-sweet" water pipe is consolatory in the "nostalgic haze" created.
consolatory writing produced in anticipation of sorrow, where the
He also reads music as consolatory for Morrison's title-character Sula, and in so doing acknowledges the "multifaceted function" of music in African American culture.
1-3) prepares for the more detailed discussion of the letter's consolatory aspects in Part 2, "Consolation in Philippians" (chaps.
South Korea sent a consolatory message to China on Sunday over Friday's bombing by NATO of the Chinese Embassy in Belgrade, a South Korean Foreign Affairs and Trade Ministry spokesman said Monday.