console

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console

1. an ornamental bracket, esp one used to support a wall fixture, bust, etc.
2. the part of an organ comprising the manuals, pedals, stops, etc.
3. a unit on which the controls of an electronic system are mounted
4. same as games console

Console

A vertical decorative bracket in the form of a scroll, projecting from a wall to support a cornice, window, or a piece of sculpture.

console

[′kän‚sōl]
(computer science)
The section of a computer that is used to control the machine manually, correct errors, manually revise the contents of storage, and provide communication in other ways between the operator or service engineer and the central processing unit. Also known as master console.
A display terminal together with its keyboard.
(engineering)
A main control desk for electronic equipment, as at a radar station, radio or television station, or airport control tower. Also known as control desk.
A large cabinet for a radio or television receiver, standing on the floor rather than on a table.
A grouping of controls, indicators, and similar items contained in a specially designed model cabinet for floor mounting; constitutes an operator's permanent working position.

console

console, 1
1. A decorative bracket in the form of a vertical scroll, projecting from a wall to support a cornice, a door or window head, a piece of sculpture, etc.; an ancon.
2. The cabinet from which an organ is played, including the keyboards, pedals, stops, etc.
3. A panel control desk or cabinet containing dials, meters, switches, and other apparatus for controlling mechanical, hydro-mechanical, or electrical equipment.

console

console
i. That portion of aircraft cockpit in which many of the operating controls are located. The control console is normally in the form of a pedestal, which extends out from the instrument panel between the pilot's and the co-pilot's seats.
ii. In radar, this refers to radarscope as in a controller's console.
iii. A control station for any major device or system. Normally, such a console is for the seated.
iv. A control station as in the instructor's console in a simulator.

console

(1)
The operator's station of a mainframe. In times past, this was a privileged location that conveyed godlike powers to anyone with fingers on its keys. Under Unix and other modern time-sharing operating systems, such privileges are guarded by passwords instead, and the console is just the tty the system was booted from. Some of the mystique remains, however, and it is traditional for sysadmins to post urgent messages to all users from the console (on Unix, /dev/console).

console

(2)
On microcomputer Unix boxes, the main screen and keyboard (as opposed to character-only terminals talking to a serial port). Typically only the console can do real graphics or run X. See also CTY.

console

(1) The physical control panel on a computer or electronic device.

(2) A game machine. See video game console.

(3) A terminal or desktop computer used to monitor and control a network.

(4) Any display terminal.

(5) The user interface on any monitoring, management or control system. See Microsoft Management Console, HMI and OI.


Consoles that Were Consoles!
Up until the late 1970s, computers were designed with panels of blinking lights, which added to their aura of science fiction. The designs gave each computer a personality that is lacking in many of today's machines. (Top image courtesy of The Computer Museum History Center. Bottom image courtesy of Unisys Corporation.)


Consoles that Were Consoles!
Up until the late 1970s, computers were designed with panels of blinking lights, which added to their aura of science fiction. The designs gave each computer a personality that is lacking in many of today's machines. (Top image courtesy of The Computer Museum History Center. Bottom image courtesy of Unisys Corporation.)







Go Back a Few Decades
In 1951, the UNIVAC I had a very impressive console. Check out the typewriter output (right) and the oscilloscope (left). (Image courtesy of Rare Book & Manuscript Library, University of Pennsylvania.)
References in periodicals archive ?
O table, my console and my consoler, table at which I self-console, where my self consolidates {is consolidated
The Third Consoler exclaims, 'Herke gode ffrendys I zow pray / Aftyr bis woman in hast we wende / I am a-ferde ryght in good fay / here-self for sorwe bat she wyl shende' (345-8).
The Holy Spirit, being the true Paraclete, that is, the perfect consoler .
As a counselor and consoler, he was witty and wise.
His father was at a career stage in which he was frequently away from home on business, and he sought to be his mother's consoler.
Ce Jeudi rouge de 1930, les manifestants refoules et battus par la police un peu partout au Canada peuvent se consoler en pensant aux 20 000 new-yorkais confrontes a la police a cheval, aux 600 arrestations en Europe, aux 200 blesses et au camarade tue en Allemagne.
Mary Scudder leads a gathering of woman in prayer, Candace fulfills the role of ministerial consoler, and Miss Prissy prophesies.
There he was, The Great Consoler, standing at the podium, biting his lip, and speaking to a nation in shock.
Let us all take a moment and consider how we can affect the future of youth by becoming more than just the consoler after a tragedy, but rather a part of this impressive effort to safe guard our nation's children.
Thus ever and always, was the Mother the child's consoler and Perpetual Help.
As far as the concluding formula is concerned, God is again cited as the builder of Jerusalem, or more complexly as either the God of David and the builder of Jerusalem, or the consoler of Zion and the builder of Jerusalem.
More: as Ernie learns eventually, the "true, unknown Just Man" is also an "Inconsolable" (348) even as it is his destiny to be the consoler.