consolidation

(redirected from consolidations)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial.

consolidation

[kən‚säl·ə′dā·shən]
(geology)
Processes by which loose, soft, or liquid earth become coherent and firm.
Adjustment of a saturated soil in response to increased load; involves squeezing of water from the pores and a decrease in void ratio.

consolidation

1. The compaction of freshly placed concrete or mortar, usually by vibration, centrifugation, or tamping, to mold it within forms and around embedded parts and reinforcement and to eliminate voids other than entrained air. Also see compaction.
2. The process whereby soil particles are packed more closely by the application of continued pressure.
References in periodicals archive ?
[21] used a series of small-strain calculations to perform large-strain radial consolidation analysis by displacement-corrected coordinates.
It should be pointed out that the above-mentioned theory of large-strain consolidation is under free-strain conditions (equal stress consolidation).
The federal agency also approved consolidations for credit unions because they were unable to find a new CEO and one cooperative got the OK to merger because of lack of growth.
Even as the pool of credit unions continues to shrink, he said he sees more credit unions leveraging a consolidation strategy for future growth.
(2000) "The transitional impacts of municipal consolidations," Journal of Urban Affairs, 22(4): 385-417.
Local governments adopt city-county consolidation to enhance infrastructure, facilities, and public service equity (Ostrom, Bish, Ostrom, & Institute for Contemporary, 1988).
The specific research objectives of the survey include providing descriptive information on the frequency of service consolidation in the State of North Carolina and the potential for greater service delivery consolidation for local governments.
This research does suggest strong support from county managers concerning the potential for service consolidation to enhance service delivery, efficiency and accountability.
School district consolidation persists as a controversial issue in public education.
Beginning in the early part of the 20th century, the idea that bigger results in lower costs fueled the consolidation effort.
Nonhomogeneity of in situ soil is always overlooked at the time of laboratory or analytical evaluation of consolidation characteristics.
Local government consolidation schemes--such as consolidating emergency dispatch within counties, merging township and municipality duties under the county level, joining city and county public safety services, and the like--have been proffered as a means of reducing local government spending.