contact microphone


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contact microphone

[′kän‚takt ′mī·krə‚fōn]
(engineering acoustics)
A microphone designed to pick up mechanical vibrations directly and convert them into corresponding electric currents or voltages.
References in periodicals archive ?
Use a high-frequency electronically filtered/amplified contact microphone to listen for leak sounds on all meters, valves, hydrants, and other contact points.
A contact microphone is made of thin piezoelectric ceramic, which picks up vibrations when in contact with a surface and translates them into voltage signals.
While high quality recordings using these contact microphones is discouraged, their use to capture sound material for synthesis is completely validated, if the aimed for result considers and compensates for these flaws.
Alternatively, the NB 3000 completes the NB-Series with a high performing contact microphone.
Contact microphones capture impulse responses from within the piano itself and construct frequency filters based on the results.
The centerpiece of the presentation was performative sound: an installation of a half-dozen ice blocks with contact microphones frozen into them (visit http://tinyurl.
In the performance, contact microphones captured vibrations on their web of wire while an electromagnetic palm reader worked a block of old-fashioned audio tape affixed to the marble railing.
It is preferable to detect heart sounds by means of piezoelectric contact microphones and accelerometers.
The AQUA-SCOPE allows an operator to choose between the ground and direct contact microphones to detect sonic frequencies.
Indisputably, Cage impacted tremendously the musical establishment; however, the composer received mixed receptions to his work throughout his lifetime, acquiring either accolades or hostility, such as the 1964 performances of Atlas Eclipticalis by the New York Philharmonic, in which orchestral players sabotaged the performance by ignoring the notated music and destroying the contact microphones used in the work.
In this instance, Tudor sent the resulting sounds out to various objects (the score calls for eight), on which he placed contact microphones, so that they too became part of the feedback circuit.