contact microphone


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contact microphone

[′kän‚takt ′mī·krə‚fōn]
(engineering acoustics)
A microphone designed to pick up mechanical vibrations directly and convert them into corresponding electric currents or voltages.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Alternatively, the NB 3000 completes the NB-Series with a high performing contact microphone. "The high-performing bone-microphone of the NB 3000 takes speech from the cheekbone and is located in the housing of the speaker.
"There is an emphasis on intimate relationships with ecology, on the general atmosphere and the connection between people and forest." A key component is a sequence of recordings from the forest: birdsong, trees moving in the wind, rain falling on the trees, but also the sounds of bark beetles inside the tries recorded with contact microphones. These are complemented by drawings of bark beetle larvae creating lines on the surface of the wood, photographs and objects from the forest placed around the gallery space, and a two-channel video, My Body Is the Forest, the Forest Is My Body, in which Martyna Poznanska attempted to identify her own body and the forest - she recorded herself lying down and standing in the middle of the primaeval forest near to which she grew up.
Contact microphones capture impulse responses from within the piano itself and construct frequency filters based on the results.
The centerpiece of the presentation was performative sound: an installation of a half-dozen ice blocks with contact microphones frozen into them (visit http://tinyurl.com/ PQfinland for more).
In the performance, contact microphones captured vibrations on their web of wire while an electromagnetic palm reader worked a block of old-fashioned audio tape affixed to the marble railing.
It is preferable to detect heart sounds by means of piezoelectric contact microphones and accelerometers.
The AQUA-SCOPE allows an operator to choose between the ground and direct contact microphones to detect sonic frequencies.
Indisputably, Cage impacted tremendously the musical establishment; however, the composer received mixed receptions to his work throughout his lifetime, acquiring either accolades or hostility, such as the 1964 performances of Atlas Eclipticalis by the New York Philharmonic, in which orchestral players sabotaged the performance by ignoring the notated music and destroying the contact microphones used in the work.
In this instance, Tudor sent the resulting sounds out to various objects (the score calls for eight), on which he placed contact microphones, so that they too became part of the feedback circuit.
The movement continues with a setting (moderate) of the passage from "The Orchestra' that begins, "it is a principle of music/ to repeat the theme.' The movement ends as it began, except that now glissandi by the violas (which are fitted with contact microphones) simulate an air-raid siren.