contagious

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contagious

1. (of a disease) capable of being passed on by direct contact with a diseased individual or by handling clothing, etc., contaminated with the causative agent
2. (of an organism) harbouring or spreading the causative agent of a transmissible disease
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Weighted prevalence for Nematopsis was contagiously distributed among bays in all regions where the parasite was found in the body tissue of mytilids and oysters.
Bryan Adams's first album of new music since 2008 is a contagiously upbeat return to form for the Canadian singer-songwriter.
Irreverent, playful and contagiously fun, this book explains a variety of germs and the diseases they cause, from the common cold to Ebola.
His radiating smile is just as contagiously giddying as it is on television.
Although many animal species yawn, studies show only humans, chimpanzees and some domestic dogs yawn contagiously, says Steve Jones, Professor of Genetics at University College London.
No, the legend spread contagiously as more superhuman acts were accomplished.
He claimed he allowed the 'bullying' culture to grow and describing him as "contagiously sour.
One of the reasons why is that they were all perfectionists, and if you want perfection you have to be hard on yourself." Pietersen, whose England career was effectively ended by the ECB in February after a disastrous Ashes tour, was particularly disdainful towards Flower in his book, claiming he allowed the 'bullying' culture to grow and describing him as "Contagiously sour.
I do believe that era has been tarnished, and I am sad about that." Pietersen, who played in 104 Tests for England, labelled Flower as a "mood hoover" who was "contagiously sour" and "infectiously dour" in the book that went on sale on Thursday.
Pietersen is disdainful about Flower - "Contagiously sour.
Prefiguring the analysis below, this approach suggests analyzing the propensity to engage in AOD use by looking both at what it is that spreads contagiously in the nightclub assemblage (for example, practices of drinking and dancing, or the emotions of people or "moods in the air"; atmospheres), and how these suggestions are spatially and affectively conditioned.
Furthermore, they are never fixed in any one individual, and they spread contagiously. Physical forces have similar properties; we perceive their effects when they resist us, "but not the force itself" (369).