content-free

content-free

(1)
(By analogy with "context-free") Used of a message that adds nothing to the recipient's knowledge. Though this adjective is sometimes applied to flamage, it more usually connotes derision for communication styles that exalt form over substance or are centred on concerns irrelevant to the subject ostensibly at hand. Perhaps most used with reference to speeches by company presidents and other professional manipulators.

See also four-colour glossies.

content-free

(2)
Within British schools the term refers to general-purpose software such as a word processor, a spreadsheet or a program that tests spelling of words supplied by the teacher. This is in contrast to software designed to teach a particular topic, e.g. a plant growth simulation, an interactive periodic table or a program that tests spelling of a predetermined list of words. Content-free software can be more cost-effective as it can be reused for many lessons throughout the syllabus.
References in periodicals archive ?
On the company's Amazon page, it is advertising the tube as "Jaffa Cakes Massive Xmas Tube 'A Yard of Jaffa'" despite the tube being 32 inches long, including 4 inches of content-free filler.
We wonder how many content-free speeches a Prime Minister can give before people stop listening?
Blockbuster culture is increasingly content-free, designed to mark time while getting to the next bit in the franchise -- though the film is patchily enjoyable, and certainly better than a cat video.
To be sure, streaming video isn't a perfect solution to today's content-free elementary schools.
Is it any wonder the abortion militants increasingly have an image problem, one some of the saner types are trying to rectify by sort of giving up on the content-free "pro-choice" idiom?
The content-free, feel-good "faith formation" that bloomed in the mid-70s had not yet been implemented.
They assert a content-free physicality that surprisingly harmonized with the rest of the exhibition's pictorial and physical material.
The worst thing about Taipei, and also the best, is that every humdrum utterance of the narrative voice, every static, content-free description of a banal action or egocentric observation has authenticity." LYDIA MILLET
"This is particularly fascinating because it has recently been shown that differences in usage of content-free words are a signature of different stylistic periods in the history of western literature," said Dr Alberto Acerbi, a Newton Fellow in the Department of Archaeology and Anthropology at the University of Bristol and lead author of the paper.
Consider the exercise Linklater conducts with a crew of actors and academics on the Aegean isle of Santorini (page 44), designed, in her words, "to de-wire the brain in order to let the emotion through." Rather than delivering lines, the speakers replaced the words with a breathed-out "fff"--a content-free exhalation that, even without language, stirred the performers to new levels of expressiveness.
Curriculum must be developed that does not treat reading as a content-free activity if students are to reach 12th grade as competent and independent readers.