Contextualism

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Contextualism

An approach to urban planning that considers the city in its totality, the view that the experience of a city is greater than the sum of its parts. According to proponents, all architecture must fit into, respond to, and mediate its immediate surroundings.

contextualism

The “fitting-in” of a building with surrounding buildings so that it is in harmony with them, especially in terms of scale, form, mass, and color.
References in periodicals archive ?
Contextualists prefer a soft parol evidence rule: a rule that uses extrinsic evidence to determine whether the exceptions to the parol evidence rule apply.
The contextualists have made clear the many factors that play a role in the context of use in ICT4D projects.
As we saw, contextualists as well as semanticists accounts to linguistic content face some problems when they try to explain the consequences of this claim.
The moderate contextualists argue that this sentence is missing something that must be supplied to express a full proposition--it is semantically incomplete because it does not specify the factor for which the steel is lacking sufficient strength.
Collingwood himself, however, was far more censorious of this approach than modern contextualists such as Winch, claiming that to attribute to an historical author views that he never held was like 'planting treasonable correspondence' in someone's coat pocket (Derbyshire 2009, p.
Contextualists, organicists, and formists tend to lack the precision of mechanistic thinking.
Importantly, functional contextualists search for variables that predict a particular event and would, if manipulated, affect the probability or prevalence of the event.
The authors are mostly in agreement in their commitment to a contextualist approach to the study of political thought, though there is some debate concerning the object and scope of British political thought in the early modern period.
What the Contextualists called the play of claim/counterclaim, I believe, is a difference that lies beyond any propositional claim or counterclaim; it is, rather, difference that infects the poetic as such.
In addition, contextualists have pointed out that we might be misled simply because we have a different (e.
Contextualists considered, among other things, the origins of the texts and their cultural contexts, including the place, time, occasion, and nature of the performances.
Contextualists hold that the truth conditions of knowledge-ascribing and knowledge-denying sentences (sentences of the form "S knows that P" and "S doesn't know that P" and related variants of such sentences) fluctuate in certain ways according to the context in which they are uttered.